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SAW Instruments Launches the sam®5 GREEN Acoustic Biosensor and Reaches Into the US Market

Published: Tuesday, May 10, 2011
Last Updated: Tuesday, May 10, 2011
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sam®5 offers precise, real-time, label-free measurement of biomolecular interactions.

SAW Instruments GmbH, has announced the launch of the sam®5 GREEN acoustic biosensor, and the availability of its family of sam®5 acoustic biosensors in the US market. Founded on SAW’s proprietary Surface Acoustic Wave technology, sam®5 offers precise, real-time, label-free measurement of biomolecular interactions.

Building on the success of the existing sam®5 BLUE, which is designed for flexibility in method and applications development, the new sam®5 GREEN is purpose-built for industry customers with more routine applications, providing increased convenience and consistency.

The sam®5 GREEN uses proprietary, pre-coated, disposable sensor chips, available in a range of surface chemistries, to give a greater level of reproducibility and batch control for customers performing routine analyses.

SAW technology has aroused a great deal of interest as it is a highly cost-effective technology and can address applications ranging from measuring binding to whole cells, through to working with small molecules and fragment libraries.

“Customers have viewed sam®5 as being a highly complementary and additive technology to SPR”, commented Dr Ian Taylor, Sales and Marketing, SAW Instruments.

“We are now working with customers to deliver a range of sam®5 instruments tailored for use in different applications and laboratory settings. With the pre-coated, disposable nature and built-in user tracking of our sensor chips, and advanced monitoring of the fluidic cell lifetime, the new sam®5 GREEN system will particularly benefit our industrial customers.”

He continued, “We are also delighted to be making these products available to the US Market. There has been considerable interest ahead of the launch and we have already secured our first customer sales in the US.”


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