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New Syringe Pump for High Pressure Applications

Published: Friday, May 27, 2011
Last Updated: Friday, May 27, 2011
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New PHD ULTRA™ 4400 Syringe Pump offers enhanced flow performance, high accuracy and smooth flow from 3.06 pl/min to 215.8 ml/min.

Harvard Apparatus, has just released the New PHD ULTRA™ 4400 Syringe Pump for the most demanding high pressure applications.

This High Pressure Infusion/Withdrawal programmable pump offers enhanced flow performance, high accuracy and smooth flow from 3.06 pl/min to 215.8 ml/min.

Features include:

• Delivers more than 200 lbs linear pumping force with accurate and smooth flow, force is also adjustable for more flexibility

• Ideally suited for stainless steel syringes

• Versatile - Stand Alone, Remote, Satellite and OEM models available

• Easy-to-use touch screen, color LCD with icon interface

• Create, save and run complex methods with advanced programming features

• Effortlessly transfer methods to other pumps and/or download from a PC

• Horizontal or vertical orientation for both display and mechanism - optimizes bench space

• Flexibility in connectivity with a footswitch input, USB serial port, RS-485 ports for daisy chaining and a digital I/O. Optional RS-232 (RJ-11) ports

• Full range of accessories - syringe heaters, in-line heaters and coolers, microfluidic circuits, connectors, tubing, syringes and more

• Peace of mind - 2-year warranty and upgrade options available

The expanded capabilities of the New PHD ULTRA™ 4400 Syringe Pump will help meet and exceed research expectations.


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