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IntegenX Proves Rapid Human DNA Identification Utility at DOD Exercise

Published: Wednesday, June 22, 2011
Last Updated: Wednesday, June 22, 2011
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Fast DNA analysis yields tactical advantage in the field.

IntegenX Inc. (IXI) has disclosed that the company's RapidHIT™ 200 Human DNA Identification System repeatedly delivered correct identifications in less than two hours during simulated operational scenarios conducted by the US Department of Defense (DOD).

Engineers and technicians from several companies participated in a two-week DOD event featuring tactical scenarios designed to evaluate functional integration of emerging technologies. IntegenX was the only company at the event to demonstrate rapid DNA-based human identification.

"Using the RapidHIT 200 System, our team showed personnel from DOD and other agencies that DNA-based human identification can be accomplished in less than two hours using on-site equipment, instead of taking 12 to 15 hours in a laboratory environment," said Howard D. Goldstein, Executive Vice President of Commercial Affairs at IntegenX.

"Rapid and certain human identifications provided by the RapidHIT System conferred significant tactical advantages in the DOD's various operational scenarios. Profiles were obtained from DNA isolated from both cheek swabs and objects used by participants, and familial relationships were correctly inferred from blinded tissue samples that were several years old. The success rate of profile generation was 100 percent," he added.

The RapidHIT 200 Human Identification System automates and accelerates the process of producing standardized DNA profiles from cheek swabs, objects and other human tissue samples.

DNA profiles generated by the RapidHIT System are used to match collected samples with existing DNA records in domestic and international databases or to expand those databases.

Numerous local, state, national and international law enforcement and security agencies use DNA-based human identification to make informed decisions regarding the arrest or release of suspects, to protect national borders, and to analyze crime scene evidence.

The system is designed to be used by anyone who can operate a cell phone, rather than a highly trained laboratory scientist.

After its successful debut, IntegenX is now accepting sales orders for the RapidHIT 200 Human Identification System, which will be available for early access customers at the end of 2011.


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