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Sony DADC to Enter Into a Manufacturing Agreement with Trinean

Published: Friday, April 04, 2014
Last Updated: Thursday, April 03, 2014
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Sony DADC to supply microfluidic disposables for Trinean’s high throughput DropSense96™ spectrometers and its Xpose™ Touch & Go sample QC analyzer.

Trinean has announced that it has entered into a manufacturing and supply agreement with Sony DADC for the production of microfluidic disposables fit for storage and micro-cuvette analysis of droplet-sized biological samples.

Sony DADC BioSciences, the leading OEM supplier of smart polymer-based consumables, is using their ISO 13485 facility in Salzburg, Austria to manufacture to Trinean’s specifications.

“We are very pleased to start working with Sony DADC,” comments Philippe Stas, CEO of Trinean. "The Sony DADC team has an in-depth understanding of microfluidic disposable production and optimization. High optical quality and reproducibility in the production process are crucial for an accurate analysis of DNA, RNA and protein samples”.

Trinean’s spectrophotometers redefine manual UV/VIS bio-sample quantification into a convenient, high speed solution. The DropSense96™ reader is geared to high throughput and integrated sample QC analysis. The Xpose™ ‘Touch & Go’ approach avoids time-consuming sample loading and cleaning steps thereby minimizing the hands-on time on the reader.

Both platforms include proprietary Spectral Content Profiling software for dye-free quantitation of DNA, RNA or protein yields combined with the detection of contaminating levels of residuals for content QC.

“We are delighted to have gained the trust of the Trinean team. Based on our extensive experience in translating polymer science into robust manufacturing processes, we look forward to supplying the microfluidic disposables to Trinean as they grow their global business footprint,” said Dr. Chris Mauracher, Senior Vice President of the BioSciences division of Sony DADC.


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