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Patent Granted to Arrayjet for Microarray Fabrication

Published: Wednesday, December 07, 2005
Last Updated: Thursday, December 08, 2005
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The European patent had been granted for 'Fabrication of microarrays by inkjet printheads'.

Arrayjet has announced that a European patent had been granted for 'Fabrication of microarrays by inkjet printheads'.

Used inside the company's Aj100 and Aj120 microarrayers this technology enables samples to be picked up from 96 or 384 well plates and then printed in arrays ranging from a few spots in a high density format to slides containing 43,000 elements or more. 

"The tricky part was getting a number of biological samples into the print head while keeping them separate," said Dr Howard Manning, founder and Technical Director of Arrayjet.

"We then let the print head take over and do what it has been designed to do.  That is producing rows of uniform and consistent spots. Our current users describe manufacturing the most beautiful arrays."

With its core technology now officially recognised, Arrayjet are talking to other manufacturers about compatible applications outside of microarray technology, and are also considering variants of its current instruments.

Duncan Hall Director of Sales and Marketing commented, "Non contact printing has clear promise for current and up and coming applications such as diagnostic microarrays."

"Dispensing 'on the fly' without contact enables Arrayjet instruments not only to produce very high quality microarrays, but also to produce them at speeds required for the throughput demands of diagnostic microarray producers."


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