Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

NIH-Funded Tissue Chips would Predict Drug Safety

Published: Friday, August 31, 2012
Last Updated: Friday, August 31, 2012
Bookmark and Share
Researchers from Cornell University will develop microphysiological modules to model the nervous, circulatory and gastrointestinal tract systems.

Cornell's Michael Shuler  has received National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding to make 3-D chips with living cells and tissues that model the structure and function of human organs and help predict drug safety.

Shuler, the James and Marsha McCormick Chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering, and James Hickman of the University of Central Florida (UCF) jointly received one of 17 NIH grants for tissue chip projects.

Shuler and Hickman's grant of approximately $9 million over five years includes subcontracts to UCF, RegenMed, GE, Sanford-Burnham and Walter Reed Army Institute. It will support their work in microphysiological systems with functional readouts for drug candidate analysis during preclinical testing.

The researchers also plan to build a 10-organ system designed to be low-cost yet highly functional to use in drug discovery, toxicity and preclinical studies.

With the funds, the NIH is supporting bio-engineered devices that will be functionally relevant and will accurately reflect the complexity of a particular tissue, including genomic diversity, disease complexity and pharmacological response.

The NIH tissue chip projects will be tested with compounds known to be safe or toxic in humans to help identify the most reliable drug safety signals -- ultimately advancing research to help predict the safety of drugs in a faster, more cost-effective way.

The initiative marks the first interagency collaboration, with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, launched by the NIH's recently created National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences. The NIH plans to commit up to $70 million over five years to the program.

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Three-Photon Microscopy Improves Biological Imaging
Scientists may be a step closer to cracking one of the world's most compelling mysteries: the impossible complexity of the brain and its billions of neurons.
Tuesday, January 22, 2013
Scientific News
High Throughput Mass Spectrometry-Based Screening Assay Trends
Dr John Comley provides an insight into HT MS-based screening with a focus on future user requirements and preferences.
Personalized Drug Screening for Multiple Myeloma Patients
A personalized method for testing the effectiveness of drugs that treat multiple myeloma may predict quickly and more accurately the best treatments for individual patients with the bone marrow cancer.
Nanocarriers May Carry New Hope for Brain Cancer Therapy
Berkeley lab researchers develop nanoparticles that can carry therapeutics across the brain blood barrier.
Cancer-Fighting Tomato Component Traced
The metabolic pathway associated with lycopene, the bioactive red pigment found in tomatoes, has been traced by researchers at the University of Illinois.
Batten Disease may Benefit from Gene Therapy
NIH-funded animal study suggests one-shot approach to injecting genes.
Shedding Light on “Dark” Cellular Receptors
UNC and UCSF labs create a new research tool to find homes for two orphan cell-surface receptors, a crucial step toward finding better therapeutics and causes of drug side effects.
Molecule Proves Key to Brain Repair After Stroke
Scientists found that a molecule known as growth and differentiation factor 10 (GDF10) plays a key role in repair mechanisms following stroke.
Towards Patient-Specific Drug Screening
A new breakthrough by the 3D stem cell printing team at Heriot-Watt could pave the way to individually tailored drug testing regimes, both reducing the need for animal testing and ensuring that patients receive drugs which are most effective for their individual needs.
Antibody Targets Key Cancer Marker
University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have created a molecular structure that attaches to a molecule on highly aggressive brain cancer and causes tumors to light up in a scanning machine.
Gut Bacteria Can Dramatically Amplify Cancer Immunotherapy
Manipulating microbes maximizes tumor immunity in mice.

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos