Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Domainex Launches Discovery STAR Award

Published: Tuesday, January 22, 2013
Last Updated: Tuesday, January 22, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Domainex Ltd is launching its Discovery STAR Award to support academic groups at the early stages of drug discovery.

Domainex’s STAR Award scheme will provide successful applicants with virtual hit screening using Domainex’s LeadBuilder platform and/or drug discovery consultancy services. The aim will be to bridge a current ‘funding gap’ for these activities, thereby allowing projects to progress to an inflection point that is suitable for larger external grant-funding schemes such as the TSB/MRC Biomedical Catalyst Fund, The Wellcome Trust’s SDDI scheme, European Union FP7, and MRC DPFS.  

Translational research is the conversion of early-stage discoveries into new health products. Domainex is a leader in the support of academic translational research and has secured funding with numerous groups at the forefront of drug target research. Once funding is in place, and in full collaboration with the academic partner, Domainex has then deployed its own capabilities in medicinal and computational chemistry, biochemistry and DMPK testing to progress hit compounds through to the identification of clinical candidate drugs.

Eddy Littler, Chief Executive Officer of Domainex, said: “Domainex has successfully supported numerous academic groups across Europe and UK to apply for drug discovery funding from a range of sources – these include The Institute of Cancer Research; St. George’s, University of London; and the University of Manchester. However, small-molecule hits are typically required before funding can be secured, and the application process can be challenging for those without a commercial background. Domainex’s Discovery STAR Award will enable this gap to be filled for the selected recipients.”

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,600+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Auspherix and Domainex Announce Collaboration
Collaboration to develop new drugs to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.
Wednesday, October 15, 2014
Scientific News
Developing a Gel that Mimics Human Breast for Cancer Research
Scientists at the Universities of Manchester and Nottingham have been funded to develop a gel that will match many of the biological structures of human breast tissue, to advance cancer research and reduce animal testing.
Lung Repair and Regeneration Gene Discovered
New role for hedgehog gene offers better understanding of lung disease.
New Gene Therapy for Vision Loss From a Mitochondrial Disease
NIH-funded study shows success in targeting mitochondrial DNA in mice.
Self-Propelled Powder to Stop Bleeding
UBC researchers have created the first self-propelled particles capable of delivering coagulants against the flow of blood to treat severe bleeding, a potentially huge advancement in trauma care.
Tension Helps Heart Cells Develop Normally in the Lab
Stanford engineers have uncovered the important role tension plays in growing heart cells out of the body.
Controlling Body Temperature in Response to 'Fight or Flight'
New research in The FASEB Journal suggests that blocking TRPV1 protein causes an increased release of noradrenaline, leading to an increase in core body temperatures.
Inroads Against Leukaemia
Potential for halting disease in molecule isolated from sea sponges.
Researchers Disguise Drugs As Platelets to Target Cancer
Researchers have for the first time developed a technique that coats anticancer drugs in membranes made from a patient’s own platelets.
A Fundamental Protection Mechanism Against Formalin In Mammals is Revealed
Formaldehyde, or formalin, is well known to all of us as a common chemical used in many industrial processes and also as a preservative, remarkably we also produce formaldehyde in our bodies.
Drug Used To Treat HIV Linked to Lower Bone Mass in Newborns
NIH study finds mothers’ use of tenofovir tied to lower bone mineral content in babies.

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,600+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos