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Nanostart-holding MagForce Receives Further Patent Related to NanoTherm Therapy

Published: Friday, May 10, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, May 09, 2013
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European patent granted for nanoparticle-drug conjugates.

Nanostart-holding MagForce has announced that the Company has been granted a further European patent for its NanoTherm therapy, for which the opposition period has now expired.

Patent EP 1871423 B1 relates to a new generation of NanoTherm particles in the form of nanoparticle-drug conjugates, which are suitable for drug delivery systems.

Nanoparticle-drug conjugates inside a tumor can be heated selectively by an alternating magnetic field leading to a temperature-dependent release of the drug inside the tumor tissue producing a high local drug concentration.

Additionally the known synergistic effects of chemotherapy in combination with hyperthermia can be utilized.

“The locally limited and externally controllable drug release by means of the now patent-protected conjugates is expected to clearly reduce the mostly considerable side-effects of conventional chemotherapeutic agents. Combining thermotherapy with nanoparticle-bound chemotherapy could also substantially increase the effectiveness of the chemotherapeutic agent in tumor treatment and reduce the number of nanoparticles required to destroy the cancer cells,” commented Prof. Dr. Hoda Tawfik, COO and co-CEO of MagForce.

Dr. Tawfik continued, “We are very pleased to have been granted a further patent for our NanoTherm therapy. By expanding our patent portfolio we will improve protection of our intellectual property and strengthen our competitive position.”

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