Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Computer Models More Accurate than Animal Trials

Published: Tuesday, May 21, 2013
Last Updated: Tuesday, May 21, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Expert systems estimate drug uptake in humans (bioavailability) more precisely than animal experiments.

In drug discovery today new drugs are tested on animals, such as rats, dogs and monkeys, to determine whether they are effective and possess sufficient oral bioavailability in these animals.

Up to now, it has been unclear whether animal studies are transferable to humans.

A detailed analysis of the bioavailability knowledge base PACT-F (Preclinical And Clinical Trials Knowledge Base on Bioavailability) from PharmaInformatic, Germany was conducted in order to compare experimental results from animal studies and from human clinical trials. The evaluation was based on more than a hundred approved and marketed drugs.

The research, carried out by PharmaInformatic, has shown that oral bioavailability in animals is inconsistent with the values reported for humans. For many drugs large differences in oral bioavailability were found between humans and animals.

Based on PACT-F, computational models were developed to predict oral bioavailability. The final expert system, called IMPACT-F, calculates human oral bioavailability much more precisely compared to animal trials.

The expert system is a highly reliable way of forecasting oral bioavailability of new drugs. Bioavailability predictions of IMPACT-F were as accurate as the common deviation between individual humans taking part in the same clinical trial.

'It has taken years to develop reliable models, since an excessive amount of clinical data had to be integrated and compared.' says Dr Wolfgang Boomgaarden, founder and CEO of PharmaInformatic. 'Now we have proof that they are significantly more efficient and reliable than animal trials and we hope they will replace useless animal trials soon.'

Every year, millions of animal experiments are carried out. Alternative methods are needed to reduce animal testing. Computational models such as IMPACT-F can replace animal trials. They require no experimental effort, are less expensive and results are almost immediately available. Since they are significantly more reliable than animal models, they will increase the prospects of successful clinical trials in humans.

Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,800+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Animal Testing can Mislead Drug Discovery and Development
Several blockbuster drugs would not be on the market, if scientists had relied solely on drug-uptake in animal trials, according to new research.
Friday, September 12, 2014
Scientific News
High Throughput Mass Spectrometry-Based Screening Assay Trends
Dr John Comley provides an insight into HT MS-based screening with a focus on future user requirements and preferences.
Personalized Drug Screening for Multiple Myeloma Patients
A personalized method for testing the effectiveness of drugs that treat multiple myeloma may predict quickly and more accurately the best treatments for individual patients with the bone marrow cancer.
Nanocarriers May Carry New Hope for Brain Cancer Therapy
Berkeley lab researchers develop nanoparticles that can carry therapeutics across the brain blood barrier.
Cancer-Fighting Tomato Component Traced
The metabolic pathway associated with lycopene, the bioactive red pigment found in tomatoes, has been traced by researchers at the University of Illinois.
Batten Disease may Benefit from Gene Therapy
NIH-funded animal study suggests one-shot approach to injecting genes.
Shedding Light on “Dark” Cellular Receptors
UNC and UCSF labs create a new research tool to find homes for two orphan cell-surface receptors, a crucial step toward finding better therapeutics and causes of drug side effects.
Molecule Proves Key to Brain Repair After Stroke
Scientists found that a molecule known as growth and differentiation factor 10 (GDF10) plays a key role in repair mechanisms following stroke.
Towards Patient-Specific Drug Screening
A new breakthrough by the 3D stem cell printing team at Heriot-Watt could pave the way to individually tailored drug testing regimes, both reducing the need for animal testing and ensuring that patients receive drugs which are most effective for their individual needs.
Antibody Targets Key Cancer Marker
University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have created a molecular structure that attaches to a molecule on highly aggressive brain cancer and causes tumors to light up in a scanning machine.
Gut Bacteria Can Dramatically Amplify Cancer Immunotherapy
Manipulating microbes maximizes tumor immunity in mice.

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,800+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,000+ scientific videos