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Drug Discovery of the Year Opens for Nominations

Published: Monday, May 27, 2013
Last Updated: Sunday, May 26, 2013
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Judges welcome submissions from across the spectrum of pharmacology.

The British Pharmacological Society (BPS) has announced that it is now accepting nominations for its Drug Discovery of the Year award.

The award was established by BPS to demonstrate the importance of pharmacology in the development of new medicines, and to reward the achievements of the teams of scientists who discover new drugs.

Drug Discovery of the Year was presented last year to the team who developed vismodegib for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma.

The announcement followed judging by the BPS Industry Committee, consisting of experts in industrial pharmacology, who reviewed nominations from across the world and a range of disease areas.

Professor Philip Routledge, BPS President, comments: “I am delighted to announce the details of Drug Discovery of the Year and to welcome submissions from across the whole spectrum of pharmacology. BPS intends to build on the number and high quality of the nominations received in 2012, all of which demonstrated the importance of pharmacology in drug discovery.”

This year, BPS Industry Committee will consider nominations for the discovery team behind a drug - whether a large or a small molecule - that best fulfils the following criteria:
• gained regulatory approval within the last three years in the EU and/or US
• preclinical to clinical translation shows the importance of pharmacology in the drug discovery/development process
• has a significant impact on an unmet medical need
• first-in-class, or is a significant improvement over other drugs in the class
• mechanism of action known

Nominations must be received by 1 October 2013. The winning team will be publicly announced during the BPS flagship meeting Pharmacology 2013, held in London 17-19 December 2013 and attended by an anticipated 1,000 pharmacologists.

The award neither promotes the administration, consumption, prescription, purchase, recommendation, sale, supply or use of the winning medicine; nor does it pre-empt any regulatory decisions.


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