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  Events - February 2013


Bioinorganic Chemistry Conference 2013

19 Feb 2013 - 22 Feb 2013 - Lanzarote, Spain



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Metals are receiving ever-increasing recognition for their roles in biological processes. It is estimated that over one third of all proteins contain at least one metal ion as essential prosthetic group, and it is well recognized that those metallobiomolecules are of key importance for a large number of biological reactions and phenomena, including electron transfer, oxidation reactions involved in metabolism and catabolism, hydrolysis reactions, synthesis and metabolic function of genes, regulation of protein expression, cell signalling, etc.. A detailed understanding of the regulation and molecular mechanisms of metalloprotein function is not only of fundamental interest, but is of great importance to the pharmaceutical, agricultural, biotechnological, and environmental industries. In the end it may also pave the way for various technological applications of the principles of biocatalysis, since metalloenzymes are capable of carrying out energetically difficult chemical transformations (such as the fixation of dinitrogen to ammonia or the oxidation of methane to methanol) under mild and environmentally safe conditions. Emulating the unique reactivity of metalloenzymes by small synthetic complexes for the ultimate goal of catalytic applications is thus a formidable task. This conference now brings together chemists, biologists and biophysicists that interrogate the role of metal ions in biological systems, using both experimental and theoretical approaches. The conference provides a stimulating and interdisciplinary environment for both senior scientists and young researchers to discuss latest progress in the field of bioinorganic chemistry, with topics ranging from structural biology to bioinspired coordination chemistry and medicinal applications of metallodrugs.



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