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Eppendorf Named as Official Sponsor of Amateur Photography Competition

Published: Thursday, March 27, 2014
Last Updated: Wednesday, March 26, 2014
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Home, habitat & shelter 2014 photography competition by the Society of Biology.

The annual amateur photography competition run by the Society of Biology recognizes some of the most inspiring images of the natural world.

The theme for the 2014 competition is ‘Home, Habitat and Shelter’ and opened on the 10th March to submissions showing the unique ways animals, plants and organisms exploit their environment to survive.

Eppendorf, a leading manufacturer of laboratory equipment, has been named as the official sponsor of this year’s event.

Entries can be submitted for the adult and under-18 categories until the 31st July, with the winners to be announced in October during Biology Week 2014.

The Society is holding a free exhibition of shortlisted entries from the past two years to coincide with the launch of this year’s competition. These are being shown in the atrium of the Royal Institution until the 11th April and will also feature 2013’s winning image, ‘Hunting Nectar’, by Putu Sudiarta.

“We are very much looking forward to being associated with the Society of Biology in this new partnership,” said Geoff Simmons, Brand & Communications Manager at Eppendorf UK. “We believe that this latest undertaking follows the same vision as our own brand values within the life science sector, and hope it will encourage both current and future biologists to become inspired.”

Eppendorf has been supplying the life science market with premium quality products and services since 1945. It’s ever expanding portfolio encompasses pipettes and automated pipetting solutions, PCR thermal cyclers, ultra-low temperature freezers and bioprocessing systems.

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