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Hiden Biostream System for Biofuel Research

Published: Thursday, June 05, 2014
Last Updated: Thursday, June 05, 2014
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Real-time analysis of dissolved gases and vapours in aqueous solutions.

The Hiden Biostream system is a research-grade mass spectrometer developed specifically for applications in biofuel research to provide real-time analysis of dissolved gases and vapours in aqueous solutions, identifying and quantifying in real time gaseous species with molecular weights up to 300 amu.

Algae-based biofuels such as biodiesel or bioethanol can have advantages over crop-based biofuels, growing at a significantly faster rate than many complex plants and, grown in compact closed systems, having potentially greater yield per unit area.

The short reproduction cycle of suitable biofuel candidates together with the Hiden Biostream dissolved species analyzer enables a fast testing and development cycle with subsequent potential cost benefit.

The Hiden Biostream system is fully programmable for both multiple and single species monitoring. The wide choice of inlet manifold and membrane separator styles enables a diverse application range offering sequential measurement from single up to 80 sampling points.

The system is equally suited to fermentation culture analysis, to monitoring gaseous and volatile organic species in media such as sea water and soils, and to evolved gas studies from microbiological systems. A custom-design service is available for interface optimization for non-standard requirements.


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