Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
AgriGenomics
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Replace Reduce Refine

Published: Friday, July 18, 2014
Last Updated: Friday, July 18, 2014
Bookmark and Share
A way forward for antibiotic use in agriculture.

A framework for replacement, reduction and refinement needs to be established for the responsible use of antimicrobials along the food supply chain. This is one of the main findings put forward by a top-level roundtable, Antimicrobials - Who Needs Them, chaired by the sustainable farming research and development business, the Food Animal Initiative, and pharmaceutical company, Ceva.

The roundtable, which was held last month, also agreed a path for establishing new and standardized measures for antibiotic use that can be implemented at producer level, as well as to direct changes in the way antibiotics are used at both national and regional level.

A common understanding and definition of the term “Critically Important Antimicrobials” (CIA) and which antibiotics that are used in food producing animals can be described as ‘critically important’ is also urgently required.

The roundtable drew together vets, food scientists, farmers and representatives of the food and animal health industries to discuss concerns over the use of antibiotics and the growing problems that are being encountered regarding antibiotic resistance and human health.

Managing Director of Ceva UK and Ireland, Alan Doyle, commented: “We convened the roundtable to explore ways to effectively and responsibly manage antimicrobial use in food production in a way that decelerates the development of resistance in both humans and animals, protects animal welfare, and ensures our ability to feed the world in a safe and sustainable manner.”

“There is now clear public consensus that we need to take action to protect the future of antibiotics. Our objective in organizing this roundtable with the Food Animal Initiative was to identify practical steps through which we can restore the central roles of the veterinarian and the animal at the centre of a rational prescription process. The 3R's and other practical resolutions resulting from the coming together of all stakeholders are the first steps to influencing real action at the farm level”.

The roundtable recognized that there is variation in the attitudes of farmers and vets to the use of antibiotics and that poor practice in their use is often the result of a lack of knowledge or understanding about them. By changing existing behaviour and through training and standard practices, the situation could be improved.

Chair of the roundtable and Veterinary Director of the Food Animal Initiative, Ruth Layton, commented: “Vets must ultimately be responsible for prescribing antibiotics and vets too need training and support to ensure this is carried out responsibly. A new way of measuring the use and dosage of antibiotics - bringing the measurement for animals closer to the definition of a defined daily dose (DDD) that is used for humans - would support this.”

The roundtable concluded that the most important way forward to stimulate responsible use of antibiotics in livestock production was to adapt measures introduced in the 1950’s to replace, reduce and refine their use. And the measures that should be implemented by vets, farmers, producers, retailers and the pharmaceutical industry, need to be communicated to consumers.

The measures were brought in 60 years ago to address concerns about the responsible use of animals for experimental scientific research, but the round table said that the principles are equally applicable to the use of antimicrobials.


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,400+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,700+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
How a Kernel Got Naked and Corn Became King
Ten thousand years ago, a golden grain got naked, brought people together and grew to become one of the top agricultural commodities on the planet.
TOPLESS Plants Provide Clues to Human Molecular Interactions
Scientists at Van Andel Research Institute have revealed an important molecular mechanism in plants that has significant similarities to certain signaling mechanisms in humans, which are closely linked to early embryonic development and to diseases such as cancer.
New Technique for Mining Health-conferring Soy Compounds
A new procedure devised by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists to extract lunasin from soybean seeds could expedite further studies of this peptide for its cancer-fighting potential and other health benefits.
Rice Disease-Resistance Discovery Closes the Loop for Scientific Integrity
Researchers reveal how disease resistant rice detects and responds to bacterial infections.
Pesticide Found in 70 Percent of Massachusetts’ Honey Samples
New Harvard University study says that the pesticide commonly found in honey samples is implicated in Colony Collapse Disorder.
Oxitec ‘Self-Limiting Gene’ Offers Hope for Controlling Invasive Moth
A new pesticide-free and environmentally-friendly way to control insect pests has moved ahead with the publication of results showing that Oxitec diamondback moths (DBM) with a ‘self-limiting gene’ can dramatically reduce populations of DBM.
More Rice, Less Greenhouse Gas?
An international group from China, Sweden and the U.S. has unveiled a genetically modified super rice that has more starch, yet releases a fraction of the harmful gas methane.
Kiwi Bird Genome Sequenced
The kiwi, national symbol of New Zealand, gives insights into the evolution of nocturnal animals.
Yeast Cells Use Signaling Pathway to Modify Their Genomes
Researchers at the Babraham Institute and Cambridge Systems Biology Centre, University of Cambridge have shown that yeast can modify their genomes to take advantage of an excess of calories in the environment and attain optimal growth.
Faster, Better, Cheaper: a New Method to Generate Extended Data for Genome Assemblies
The Genome Analysis Centre have developed a new library construction method for genome sequencing that can simultaneously construct up to 12 size-selected long mate pair (LMP) or ‘jump’ libraries ranging in sizes from 1.7kb to 18kb with reduced DNA input, time and cost.
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,400+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,700+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!