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Expression of Wnt5a in Urothelial Carcinoma as a Potential Prognostic Marker
Mark Saling 1, Jordan K. Duckett 1, Scott Jenkinson 2 and Ramiro Malgor 3

Our results support the previous studies that suggest Wnt5a plays a pathological role in urothelial carcinoma.

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DHPLC Technology as a High-throughput Detection of Mutations in a Durum Wheat TILLING Population
Colasuonno P.1, Incerti O. 1, Lozito M.L. 1, Sbalzarini M. 2, Zaccagna P. 2, Papadimitriou S. 2, Blanco A. 1, Gadaleta A. 1

This study is a beautiful example of DHPLC technology application and shows an alternative tool to current strategies of SNP detection based on genotyping array.

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IDENTIFICATION AND DIFERENTIATION OF Verticillium SPECIES WITH PCR MARKERS AND SEQUENCING OF ITS REGION
Taja Jesenicnik, Nataša Štajner, Jernej Jakše, Sebastijan Radišek and Branka Javornik

The genus Verticillium is a group of ascomycete fungi, including plant-pathogenic species capable of affecting the vasculature of many agricultural crops, and therefore causes major economic losses worldwide. In 2011, a new taxonomic classification of the genus was proposed, which is now referred to as Verticillium sensu stricto, comprising ten species: V. dahliae V. albo-atru, V. alfalfae, V. longisporum, V. nonalfalfae, V. tricorpus, V. zaregamsianum, V. nubilum, V. isaacii and V. klebahnii. <

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Population characterization of Brazilian isolates of Ceratocystis spp. using microsatellites
Edson Luiz Furtado, Ana Carolina Firmino,  Michael Mbenoun, Denise Nakada Nosaki, Ariska Van der Nest, Jolanda Roux, Irene Bernes, Mike Wingfield

The genus Ceratocystis includes several species of economically important plant pathogens and has a global distribution. In Brazil, species in the genus cause disease and death of hosts such as cacao, eucalypts and mango. This study aimed to characterize the population structure and diversity of isolates of Ceratocystis fimbriata sensu lato collected from diseased Eucalyptus species and to compare these to isolates from cacao, mango, teak, fig, rubber and atemoya.

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Geneious R8: A Powerful and Comprehensive Suite of Molecular Biology Tools

Christian Olsen, Kashef Qaadri, Richard Moir, Matt Kearse, Simon Buxton, Matthew Cheung, Hengjie Wang, Jonas Kuhn, Steven Stones-Havas, Chris Duran

Geneious R8: A powerful and comprehensive suite of molecular biology tools.

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Putative Genes Identified on Two Growth Conditions of G. boninense
Jayanthi N, Abrizah O, Low ETL, O-Abdullah M, Hogan M, Cuomo CA, Desjardins C, Abdul Manaf MA, Rajinder S, Birren B and Ravigadevi S

Putative genes identified on two growth conditions of Ganoderma boninense.

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Identifying marker-trait associations for Fiber Components in Sugarcane with Simple Sequence Repeat Markers
Karine Kettener; Natalia Spagnol Stabellini, Marcia Moreno, Karine Miranda Oliveira, Itaraju Brum, Francisco Claudio da Conceicao Lopes, Thiago Benatti, Alessandro Pellegrineschi; Jorge A. da Silva; Celso Luis Marino.

Identifying marker-trait associations for Fiber Components in Sugarcane with Simple Sequence Repeat Markers.

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Contrasting Patterns of Neutral and Adaptive Genetic Variation of Chilean Blue Mussel (Mytilus chilensis) Due to Local Adaptation and Aquaculture
Cristian Araneda1 , M. Angelica Larrain2, Benjamin Hecht3, Shawn Narum4

This study was designed to investigate patterns of neutral and adaptive genetic variation within Chilean blue mussel populations in order to identify a subset of putatively adaptive genetic markers to investigate the population structure and to improve the ability to trace individuals to their geographical origin, especially in the area with strong aquaculture activities

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Transcription Factors to Classify Tumor Types and Subtypes
Benjamin Otto 1,2, Kristin Klätschke 2, Thomas Streichert 3, Christoph Wagener 2, Genrich Tolstonog 4

Here we introduce the use of the unsupervised approach to identify transcription factors (TFs) that are specific for different tumor types.

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Scientific News
How a Kernel Got Naked and Corn Became King
Ten thousand years ago, a golden grain got naked, brought people together and grew to become one of the top agricultural commodities on the planet.
TOPLESS Plants Provide Clues to Human Molecular Interactions
Scientists at Van Andel Research Institute have revealed an important molecular mechanism in plants that has significant similarities to certain signaling mechanisms in humans, which are closely linked to early embryonic development and to diseases such as cancer.
New Technique for Mining Health-conferring Soy Compounds
A new procedure devised by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists to extract lunasin from soybean seeds could expedite further studies of this peptide for its cancer-fighting potential and other health benefits.
Rice Disease-Resistance Discovery Closes the Loop for Scientific Integrity
Researchers reveal how disease resistant rice detects and responds to bacterial infections.
Pesticide Found in 70 Percent of Massachusetts’ Honey Samples
New Harvard University study says that the pesticide commonly found in honey samples is implicated in Colony Collapse Disorder.
Oxitec ‘Self-Limiting Gene’ Offers Hope for Controlling Invasive Moth
A new pesticide-free and environmentally-friendly way to control insect pests has moved ahead with the publication of results showing that Oxitec diamondback moths (DBM) with a ‘self-limiting gene’ can dramatically reduce populations of DBM.
More Rice, Less Greenhouse Gas?
An international group from China, Sweden and the U.S. has unveiled a genetically modified super rice that has more starch, yet releases a fraction of the harmful gas methane.
Kiwi Bird Genome Sequenced
The kiwi, national symbol of New Zealand, gives insights into the evolution of nocturnal animals.
Yeast Cells Use Signaling Pathway to Modify Their Genomes
Researchers at the Babraham Institute and Cambridge Systems Biology Centre, University of Cambridge have shown that yeast can modify their genomes to take advantage of an excess of calories in the environment and attain optimal growth.
Faster, Better, Cheaper: a New Method to Generate Extended Data for Genome Assemblies
The Genome Analysis Centre have developed a new library construction method for genome sequencing that can simultaneously construct up to 12 size-selected long mate pair (LMP) or ‘jump’ libraries ranging in sizes from 1.7kb to 18kb with reduced DNA input, time and cost.
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