Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
AgriGenomics
Scientific Community
 
Join | Sign in
Home>Resources>Posters

  Posters

Expression of Wnt5a in Urothelial Carcinoma as a Potential Prognostic Marker
Mark Saling 1, Jordan K. Duckett 1, Scott Jenkinson 2 and Ramiro Malgor 3

Our results support the previous studies that suggest Wnt5a plays a pathological role in urothelial carcinoma.

More information
DHPLC Technology as a High-throughput Detection of Mutations in a Durum Wheat TILLING Population
Colasuonno P.1, Incerti O. 1, Lozito M.L. 1, Sbalzarini M. 2, Zaccagna P. 2, Papadimitriou S. 2, Blanco A. 1, Gadaleta A. 1

This study is a beautiful example of DHPLC technology application and shows an alternative tool to current strategies of SNP detection based on genotyping array.

More information
IDENTIFICATION AND DIFERENTIATION OF Verticillium SPECIES WITH PCR MARKERS AND SEQUENCING OF ITS REGION
Taja Jesenicnik, Nataša Štajner, Jernej Jakše, Sebastijan Radišek and Branka Javornik

The genus Verticillium is a group of ascomycete fungi, including plant-pathogenic species capable of affecting the vasculature of many agricultural crops, and therefore causes major economic losses worldwide. In 2011, a new taxonomic classification of the genus was proposed, which is now referred to as Verticillium sensu stricto, comprising ten species: V. dahliae V. albo-atru, V. alfalfae, V. longisporum, V. nonalfalfae, V. tricorpus, V. zaregamsianum, V. nubilum, V. isaacii and V. klebahnii. <

More information
Population characterization of Brazilian isolates of Ceratocystis spp. using microsatellites
Edson Luiz Furtado, Ana Carolina Firmino,  Michael Mbenoun, Denise Nakada Nosaki, Ariska Van der Nest, Jolanda Roux, Irene Bernes, Mike Wingfield

The genus Ceratocystis includes several species of economically important plant pathogens and has a global distribution. In Brazil, species in the genus cause disease and death of hosts such as cacao, eucalypts and mango. This study aimed to characterize the population structure and diversity of isolates of Ceratocystis fimbriata sensu lato collected from diseased Eucalyptus species and to compare these to isolates from cacao, mango, teak, fig, rubber and atemoya.

More information
Geneious R8: A Powerful and Comprehensive Suite of Molecular Biology Tools

Christian Olsen, Kashef Qaadri, Richard Moir, Matt Kearse, Simon Buxton, Matthew Cheung, Hengjie Wang, Jonas Kuhn, Steven Stones-Havas, Chris Duran

Geneious R8: A powerful and comprehensive suite of molecular biology tools.

More information
Putative Genes Identified on Two Growth Conditions of G. boninense
Jayanthi N, Abrizah O, Low ETL, O-Abdullah M, Hogan M, Cuomo CA, Desjardins C, Abdul Manaf MA, Rajinder S, Birren B and Ravigadevi S

Putative genes identified on two growth conditions of Ganoderma boninense.

More information
Identifying marker-trait associations for Fiber Components in Sugarcane with Simple Sequence Repeat Markers
Karine Kettener; Natalia Spagnol Stabellini, Marcia Moreno, Karine Miranda Oliveira, Itaraju Brum, Francisco Claudio da Conceicao Lopes, Thiago Benatti, Alessandro Pellegrineschi; Jorge A. da Silva; Celso Luis Marino.

Identifying marker-trait associations for Fiber Components in Sugarcane with Simple Sequence Repeat Markers.

More information
Contrasting Patterns of Neutral and Adaptive Genetic Variation of Chilean Blue Mussel (Mytilus chilensis) Due to Local Adaptation and Aquaculture
Cristian Araneda1 , M. Angelica Larrain2, Benjamin Hecht3, Shawn Narum4

This study was designed to investigate patterns of neutral and adaptive genetic variation within Chilean blue mussel populations in order to identify a subset of putatively adaptive genetic markers to investigate the population structure and to improve the ability to trace individuals to their geographical origin, especially in the area with strong aquaculture activities

More information
Transcription Factors to Classify Tumor Types and Subtypes
Benjamin Otto 1,2, Kristin Klätschke 2, Thomas Streichert 3, Christoph Wagener 2, Genrich Tolstonog 4

Here we introduce the use of the unsupervised approach to identify transcription factors (TFs) that are specific for different tumor types.

More information
<< 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 >>
Showing Results 41 - 50 of 137
Scientific News
How the Mammoth Got its Wool
Evolutionary change in a gene reconstructed in the lab from the woolly mammoth was part of a suite of adaptations that allowed the mammoth to survive in harsh arctic environments, according to new research.
Animals’ Genomic Buffers May Help Humans
Researchers at Duke University School of Medicine and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School have identified a mechanism that explains why some mutations can be disease-causing in one genome but benign in another.
Expanding the DNA Alphabet: 'Extra' DNA Base Found to be Stable in Mammals
A rare DNA base, previously thought to be a temporary modification, has been shown to be stable in mammalian DNA, suggesting that it plays a key role in cellular function.
Mistletoe Lacks Genes Found in All Complex Organisms
Indiana University scientists have discovered the first known instance of a plant or animal lacking several key genes involved in energy production in cells.
Mold Unlocks New Route to Biofuels
Scientists have made an important discovery that forms the basis for the development of new applications in biofuels and the sustainable manufacturing of chemicals.
Britain Needs 'Super-Sub Bees'
Rare bees and insects must be protected to give British farmers a strong ‘reserve squad’ of pollinating species and prevent potential food shortages in the future, scientists say.
Massive Genome Shift in one Generation
A team of biologists has discovered that an agricultural pest that began plaguing U.S. apple growers in the 1850s likely did so after undergoing extensive and genome-wide changes in a single generation.
Scientists Reveal Underpinnings of Drought Tolerance in Plants
Genome-wide analysis elucidates drought-tolerance system in Arabidopsis.
Crop-rotation Resistant Rootworms Have A Lot Going on in Their Guts
After decades of effort, scientists are finally figuring out how insects develop resistance to environmentally friendly farming practices – such as crop rotation – that are designed to kill them.
Longstanding Problem Put to Rest
Proof that a 40-year-old algorithm for comparing genomes is the best possible will come as a relief to computer scientists.
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters