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Scorpion

Product Description

Scorpion 150 pixels JPEG1.jpgThe KBiosystems’ Scorpion Stacking robot/stacker has a narrow footprint to ensure premium benchtop workspace is left available for the end user. Instant interface is offered with KBiosystems product range of microplate & microtube sealers, microplate & microtube printing and barcoder and also our colony picking instrumentation, but can be fully integrated with all other equipment such as plate readers, plate washing stations and as part of larger systems as and where required. The Scorpion has a standardised stack capacity of either 30 or 72 microplates, but we can accommodate other volumes of stack upon request. The Scorpion has the ability to handle lidded and non-lidded plate types with a fast cycle time for each. Available in both left and right hand feeds and the ability to extend the reach to a standard 62mm, longer upon request, the Scorpion is versatile and robust. Able to deal with all plate and tube heights the Scorpion has a “restack” option if plate arrangement is important.

Key Features:

Operator Friendly – Whether a stand alone system or part of a larger integrated system the Scorpion offers easy to use software allowing speed, reliability and robustness for any automation requirement.

Fast – Speed is always a strong requirement and the Scorpion can handle a single stack of 72 plates in just 10 minutes.

Versatile – The Scorpion is modular and also has the benefit of allowing twin systems to work in parallel to increase throughput.

Reliable – After years of producing stacking robots/stackers, KBiosystems have a depth of experience and knowledge in laboratory automation.

Perfect for Integration – Already integrated to a large number of systems working with multiple products from partnering companies.

Product Scorpion
Company KBiosystems
Price Request a quote
More Information View company product page
Catalog Number Unspecified
Quantity Unspecified
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KBiosystems
Units 5 to 10 Paycocke Close Basildon Essex

Tel: +44 (0) 1268 522431
Fax: +44 (0) 1268 270231
Email: sales@kbiosystems.com



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