Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Biologics & Bioprocessing
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

GSK and Save the Children Partner to Help Africa

Published: Friday, May 10, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, May 10, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Currently, nearly 7 million children under five die every year from preventable diseases.

In the last ten years, significant progress has been made globally to reduce the rate of child deaths, however more needs to be done to prevent children dying unnecessarily. While the needs of the world’s poorest children are diverse, there are three areas where urgent attention could help to ensure that every child receives essential healthcare:

•    More healthcare workers in these regions
•    Vaccines and medicines
•    Simple nutritious food

Making a change

We are embarking on an ambitious global partnership with Save the Children to share our expertise and resources and focus on these three areas in order to make a lasting change for the world’s most vulnerable children.

The new partnership goes well beyond the traditional charity corporate fundraising model. It will touch many areas of our business, in particular using our R&D capabilities to help save children’s lives.

The GSK and Save the Children partnership will focus in particular on:

•    developing child-friendly medicines to reduce child mortality and new-born deaths
•    widening vaccination coverage to reduce the number of child deaths in the hardest to reach communities
•    researching new affordable nutritional products to help alleviate malnutrition in children
•    increasing investment in the training, reach and scope of health workers in the poorest communities to help reduce child mortality

Beginning with programmes in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Kenya, we plan to develop programmes to tackle child mortality and to establish models that can be adopted, expanded and replicated in other developing countries.

Our ambition is to share a blueprint for a new way of working, transforming the traditional fundraising NGO/corporate model. The scale, breadth and ambition of this global partnership far exceeds anything that GSK or Save the Children have done before.

Together, we’ll also use our influence to call for improved policy and practice, and increased international investment in children’s health.

GSK and Save the Children in DRC

The first of our joint programmes – the ‘Integrated project for the battle against childhood diseases’ - will be rolled out in the DRC. Devastated by political and social instability for decades, the DRC is experiencing one of the worst humanitarian crises in the world. It is ranked 187th out of 187 countries in the Human Development Index and life expectancy is low at just 46 years old. The majority of the population lack access to basic services and half of the 66 million population live on less than $1 a day.

The health challenges in DRC, including high levels of infectious diseases, are made more difficult because of gaps in human resources at all levels of the health system – there is just one doctor and only five nurses per 10,000 people. Child mortality rates are among the highest in Africa, with over 400, 000 children dying before the age of five each year, mainly from preventable diseases.

Working with Save the Children, the government of DRC and communities, the programme will deliver an integrated package of essential services for neonatal, maternal and child health. This will include strengthening current systems and infrastructure, to ensure that basic health and nutrition services, and  equipment, supplies and suitably trained staff are accessible to effectively treat common childhood diseases.

GSK has committed £9m to support this programme, which began in April 2013.

GSK and Save the Children in Kenya

Nearly 25% of the 39 million people who live in Kenya survive on less than $1.25 a day, and of those more than 40% are under 15 years old. Across the country, one child in ten dies before their fifth birthday and in the slums of the capital Nairobi and the rural north, this figure is much higher.

Through our partnership we have committed to support Save the Children Kenya’s newborn child survival programme. The programme will focus on improving health systems in order to reduce preventable diseases and to address under five child mortality. In addition to funding this programme, we are making a significant investment through Save the Children’s business, prioritising and progressing the research and development of vital medicines and products to reduce preventable diseases and child mortality.

We have committed over £4m to support this programme, and development is in the early stages. Funding will start later in 2013.


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

GSK, Francis Crick Institute Collaborate
This partnership sets out to explore new avenues of medical research and drug discovery across a broad range of diseases, with a view to achieving breakthroughs in the understanding of human disease.
Monday, July 20, 2015
GSK and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to Accelerate Research into Vaccines
The joint initiative will endeavour to make vaccines more resistant to heat, thus reducing the need for refrigeration.
Wednesday, October 30, 2013
Malaria Vaccine Could be Available from 2015
GSK candidate reduces disease over 18 Months of follow-up in late-stage study of more than 15,000 infants and young children.
Tuesday, October 08, 2013
Funding boost for GSK’s Open Innovation Research
GSK announced a funding injection of up to £5m from the Wellcome Trust to support its open approach to discovering and developing new treatments for diseases of the developing world.
Wednesday, May 08, 2013
Scientific News
Immunotherapy Agent Benefits Patients with Drug-Resistant Multiple Myeloma in First Human Trial
Daratumumab proved generally safe in patients, even at the highest doses.
Inciting an Immune Attack On Cancer Cells
A new minimally invasive vaccine that combines cancer cells and immune-enhancing factors could be used clinically to launch a destructive attack on tumors.
Less May Be More in Slowing Cholera Epidemics
Mathematical model shows more cases may be prevented and more lives saved when using one dose of cholera vaccine instead of recommended two doses.
NIH Launches Human RSV Study
Study aims to understand infection in healthy adults to aid development of RSV medicines, vaccines.
Flu Remedies Help Combat E. coli Bacteria
Physiologists from the University of Zurich have now discovered why the intestinal bacterium Escherichia coli (E. coli) multiplies heavily and has an inflammatory effect.
'Fountain of Youth' Protein Points to Possible Human Health Benefit
Patients with higher blood levels of growth factor have lower risk of cardiovascular problems.
Lemon Juice and Human Norovirus
Citric acid may prevent the highly contagious norovirus from infecting humans, scientists discovered from the German Cancer Research Center.
Study Backs Flu Vaccinations for Elderly
Brown University researchers found vaccines well matched to the year’s flu strain significantly reduce deaths and hospitalizations compared to when the match is poor, suggesting that vaccination indeed makes a difference.
Inciting an Immune Attack on Cancer Cells
A new minimally invasive vaccine that combines cancer cells and immune-enhancing factors could be used clinically to launch a destructive attack on tumors.
Protein Found to Play a Key Role in Blocking Pathogen Survival
Calprotectin fends off microbial invaders by limiting access to iron, an important nutrient.
SELECTBIO

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,800+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!