Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Biologics & Bioprocessing
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

New European Vaccine Initiative

Published: Tuesday, November 26, 2013
Last Updated: Tuesday, November 26, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Leading organisations have joined forces to rapidly assess and communicate the benefits and risks of vaccines.

ADVANCE, as the project is called, is in collaboration between European researchers, public health, regulatory agencies and vaccine manufacturers. Karolinska Institutet coordinates the Swedish participation in the project.

The initiative aims to help government agencies and decision-makers in the healthcare field to make quick and well-informed decisions regarding strategies for vaccinating the European population. Such a framework would make it easier for regulators and public health authorities to make fast, more informed decisions regarding vaccination strategies, and help to maintain public confidence in immunisation, particularly when questions are raised about the safety of specific vaccines.

Researchers at the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at Karolinska Institutet will participate in the scientific studies that are planned within the ADVANCE project and also contribute their expertise regarding the establishment of the framework. Other Swedish participants include the Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control (SMI) and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), which has its headquarters in Sweden. Other important partners include the European equivalent of the Swedish Medical Products Agency, EMA, Erasmus University Rotterdam, and several major pharmaceutical companies.

The initiative is funded by the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI), which in turn is a collaboration between the EU and the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA). ADVANCE (Accelerated Development of Vaccine Benefit-risk Collaboration in Europe) receives the equivalent of SEK 95 million in funding over five years. Karolinska Institutet will receive SEK 1.4 million over the same period.

"This collaboration is unique as it is the first time that a European framework is created for evaluating vaccines. It is important that we participate in this project as Sweden has excellent prerequisites, through our health care data register, for evaluating vaccines on a population-based level", says Lisen Arnheim Dahlström, project investigator from Karolinska Institutet.

Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 5,200+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Why Pneumococci Primarily Affects Human
A sugar molecule variant may explain why pneumococcal infections occur more frequently in humans compared to other animals.
Monday, September 05, 2016
Possible Goal for New Tuberculosis-Vaccine Identified
A new study shows for the first time the essential role of the molecule SOCS3 in the control of Tuberculosis.
Monday, July 08, 2013
New Hope for Setback-dogged Cancer Treatment
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet announce breakthrough in the study of how IGF-1 receptor-binding antibodies can help those with cancer.
Wednesday, November 28, 2012
Possible New Therapy for the Treatment of a Common Blood Cancer
Research from Karolinska Institutet shows that sorafenib, a drug used for advanced cancer of the kidneys and liver, could also be effective against multiple myeloma.
Friday, September 07, 2012
Scientific News
Scientists Uncover Why Hepatitis C Vaccine is Difficult to Make
Scientists have uncovered one reason why a successful hepatitis C vaccine continues to be elusive.
Gene Editing Corrects Sickle Cell Mutation
Researchers demonstrate a potential pathway to developing gene-editing treatments for sickle cell disease.
Sustained SIV Remission Achieved in Monkeys
Experimental treatment boosts monkey immune system to force SIV into sustained remission.
Fighting Cancer with Immune Response
New treatment elicits two-pronged immune response that destroys tumors in mice.
Nanoparticles Offer Promising Platform for Flavivirus Treatment
New nanoparticle effectively vaccinated mice against one dengue strain and could be created to target all four.
Overlooked Molecules Could Revolutionise our Understanding of the Immune System
Researchers have discovered that around one third of all the epitopes displayed for scanning by the immune system are a type known as ‘spliced’ epitopes.
Signaling Pathway Could Be Key to Improved Osteoporosis Treatment
Inhibition of SIK2 enzyme both stimulates bone formation and reduces bone breakdown in animal model.
Less Frequent Cervical Cancer Screening
HPV-vaccinated women may only need one screening every 5 to 10 years with screening starting later in life.
The Power Of Orthogonality In Assessing The Stability Of Biopharmaceuticals
By utilizing orthogonal techniques, researchers can maximize the secure application of all analytical results generated.
Dysfunction in Neuronal Transport Mechanism Linked to Alzheimer’s
Findings confirm mutation-caused problem but also reveal a new therapeutic target.
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,200+ scientific videos