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Next-Generation Therapeutics for Infectious Diseases Conquer the Global Spotlight

Published: Thursday, March 27, 2014
Last Updated: Thursday, March 27, 2014
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Resistance to current drugs spurs treatment innovation in influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, chlamydia and gonorrhea.

The available antivirals for commonly occurring infections such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza are characterized by variable response, poor tolerability and suboptimal dosing regimens, limiting their regular use and efficacy.

Likewise, the development of resistance to almost every recommended antibiotic for bacterial infections like chlamydia and gonorrhoea makes treatment complicated.

Successful commercialization of next-generation therapeutics and the imminent arrival of novel innovative vaccine technologies are expected to address these issues and generate strong growth in the infectious diseases therapeutics market.

New analysis from Frost & Sullivan’s Global Infectious Diseases Therapeutics Market-Influenza, RSV, Chlamydia, and Gonorrhoea finds the influenza vaccine industry is witnessing a shift from conventional egg-based vaccines, which use live attenuated and inactivated viruses, to novel DNA-based, recombinant, sub-unit, and even microbial vector-based approaches. These technologies are becoming popular for their cost benefits and potential for mass production in the event of a pandemic.

“Several new antiviral agents, including short-interfering ribonucleic acids (siRNAs), antimicrobial peptides, and other anti-inflammatory drugs, are being evaluated in clinical trials for viral infections,” said Frost & Sullivan Healthcare Senior Research Analyst Aiswariya Chidambaram. “These ongoing clinical programs targeting newer classes of antivirals, vaccine technologies and improved diagnosis are likely to result in more sophisticated levels of treatment.”

While resistance to current drugs and viral/bacterial breakthrough remain key obstacles to effective treatment, the asymptomatic nature of sexually transmitted bacterial infections makes even diagnosis difficult. In many cases, genital infections caused by Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoea go unnoticed, as they are asymptomatic in up to 70 percent of infected women and up to 50 percent of infected men.

“Since preventative therapies can help control infectious diseases effectively, vaccines are the way forward, particularly for viral infections,” noted Chidambaram. “In fact, the global infectious diseases therapeutics market will be geared in this direction, as a way to significantly control disease burden.”

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