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Asylum Research Appoints Amir Moshar

Published: Friday, March 29, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, March 29, 2013
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Company appoints Amir to west coast US technical sales.

As part of its ongoing expansion, Asylum Research, an Oxford Instruments company, has appointed Amir Moshar for West Coast US Technical Sales.

Amir has been with Asylum for over nine years, holding various technical positions. He began as a test engineer, then continued to lead AFM technical support in the UK for two years.

Upon return to the US and until now, Amir has served as an applications scientist, gaining unique insights into customer support and user needs.

He has been instrumental in new applications development, user training and running customer demonstrations.

Amir received his MS degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

“We are very excited to welcome Amir to our technical sales group,” said John Green, Senior Vice President of Sales for Asylum Research.

Green continued, “He perfectly matches the background of our team members -numerous years of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experience and scientific applications background. His broad experience working with scientists from the applications side and his extensive knowledge of the instrumentation will make him a great resource for customers looking for straightforward answers in AFM.

Asylum Research, the technology leader in atomic force microscopy, has global sales and service, including offices in Germany, UK, and Taiwan.

Its product line of scanning probe/atomic force microscopes including the Cypher™ and MFP-3D™ AFM family, has set the industry standard for technological innovation for both imaging and characterizing many properties of surfaces and structures at the nanoscale.

Its AFM/SPMs are used by academic and industrial customers across the world for a wide range of materials and bioscience applications.

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