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Alfa Aesar Acquires Biomedical Technologies, Inc.

Published: Thursday, September 19, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, September 19, 2013
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Alfa Aesar to leverage BTI’s manufacturing capabilities to enhance its product offering.

Alfa Aesar has announced that it has completed the purchase of Biomedical Technologies, Inc. (BTI) of Stoughton, Massachusetts.

BTI has been manufacturing life science research products for more than 30 years, with a commitment to its customers of technology, quality and value.

Its product line includes specialty proteins, cell culture additives and highly specific immunoassay tools, which Alfa Aesar will continue to build upon as it expands its portfolio of unique biochemical products for the researcher.

Commenting on the transaction, Julie Butterfield, General Manager of Alfa Aesar said: “Alfa Aesar is already known for providing researchers access to unparalleled expertise and supply of a wide variety of inorganic and organic chemicals used in both academia and industry. For our customers in the life sciences, we are committed to enhancing our offer in the biochemical arena through a selection of methodically chosen products that complement our current portfolio and build on our core competencies. The acquisition of BTI brings protein research and characterization, all types of profiling tools, and certain separation technologies and provides opportunities for Alfa Aesar to leverage BTI’s manufacturing capabilities to enhance its overall product offering.”

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