Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Cell Culture
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

FEI Introduces the New Tecnai Femto Ultrafast Electron Microscope

Published: Thursday, October 31, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, October 31, 2013
Bookmark and Share
The Tecnai Femto is the first to commercialize revolutionary technology to investigate ultrafast events occurring at the nanometer femtosecond spatiotemporal scale.

FEI has released the Tecnai™ Femto ultrafast electron microscope (UEM), enabling scientists to explore ultrafast events and processes that occur at the atomic and molecular spatial scale over time spans measured in femtoseconds (10-15 seconds).

These include such fundamental processes as the absorption of light energy and its transformation into heat or mechanical changes (photoactuation) and the crystallization or recrystallization of materials-including large biological molecules for structural analysis.

The Tecnai Femto is the first system to commercialize the patented ultrafast electron microscopy technology pioneered by Nobel laureate Prof. Ahmed Zewail at the California Institute of Technology. The first Tecnai Femto UEM will be installed at the University of Minnesota in November 2013.

David Flannigan, Ray D. and Mary T. Johnson/Mayon Plastics assistant professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science at the University of Minnesota, and previously a member of Professor Zewail’s research team at Cal Tech, explained, “Over the last decade microscope manufacturers like FEI have developed instruments that have made observations of objects as small as individual atoms relatively routine. Ultrafast electron microscopy now gives us a powerful tool to look at the movements and changes that occur at this scale. Because the distances are so small, the time scale is also condensed--it doesn’t take very long to travel a nanometer or two. Using single-electron pulses, we have measured changes over time periods as short as tens of femtoseconds--those are millionths of a billionth of a second.”

“This is a truly revolutionary technology,” stated Trisha Rice, FEI’s vice president and general manager of the Materials Science Business Unit. “Until now, the only commercially-released instruments that could look at processes at this time scale were limited to observations of bulk materials. The Tecnai Femto UEM is the first to combine femtosecond time resolution with nanometer spatial resolution, allowing researchers to see the structural changes that occur at the atomic scale in response to the energetic stimuli.”

Flannigan added, “The literature already contains a wide variety of UEM applications described over two generations of instrument development in Zewail’s lab at Cal Tech since he began this work in 2004. For instance, we looked at the mechanical properties and photoactuation of silicon nitride cantilevers and at the photo-induced heating and expansion of carbon nanotubes. Looking forward, we plan to focus our attention on the development of new applications with important practical value. For example, we want to look at the crystallization of biological macro molecules preparatory to structural analysis, which could lead to important advances in understanding the structure-function relationships of complex living systems.”

The Tecnai Femto is a member of FEI’s Tecnai family of transmission electron microscopes (TEM). It has been modified to accommodate ultra short laser pulses that stimulate a brief “flash” of photoelectrons from the electron source, and a precisely-timed pulse of laser energy directed at the sample as a stimulus.

To achieve the highest temporal resolution when observing reversible processes, the Tecnai Femto UEM operates in stroboscopic mode where a large number of precisely-timed flashes, each containing as few as a single electron, build up a representative image of the sample at a given delay between stimulus and flash.

The delay is then adjusted incrementally and another image acquired, resulting ultimately in a sequence of images much like the frames of a motion picture. For irreversible processes, such as fractures, the instrument can be operated in the single pulse mode with many electrons in the pulse, but unlike the femtosecond single-electron mode, the time resolution reaches picoseconds to nanoseconds because of Coulomb repulsion. Importantly, the instrument can also be operated in conventional continuous-beam TEM mode.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 5,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
New Therapeutic Target for Crohn’s Disease
A promising new target for drugs that treat IBD has been identified along with a possible biomarker for IBD severity.
Uncovering Water Bear Resilience
A protein identified in water bears can protect DNA of human cells from lethal doses of radiation damage.
Stem Cells Growing 3D Lung-in-a-Dish
Researchers have created 3D lung-like tissue from lung-derived stem cells. The tissue can be used to study lung diseases.
Reprogramming Lymph Nodes to Fight MS
Bioengineers work to reprogram lymph node function to fight multiple sclerosis.
Puttng Cells Through Their Paces
An obstacle course for human lung cells could be the answer for better testing the effectiveness of potential new drugs.
Inherited Heart Condition Breakthrough
Using stem cells, scientists have created a specific heart condition model, yeilding insights into unexpected disease mechanisms.
Genetic Tug of War Before Cells Decide Fate
Researchers report that as developing blood cells are triggered by genetic signals firing on and off, a 'tug of war' occurs.
Origin of Cultured Cells: Not Where You Think
Study shows cultured cells from decades-old cell line does not originate from the patient it was claimed to derive from.
Worms Point Way Toward Viral Strategies
Rice University wins NIH grant to study how nematodes handle gastrointestinal viruses.
Hope for Zika Treatment Found in Drug Screening
Johns Hopkins researchers join collaborative group to screen 6,000 existing drugs in hopes of finding treatments for Zika Virus infection.
SELECTBIO

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,000+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!