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Agilent Introduces Next-Generation Atomic Force Microscope

Published: Thursday, December 05, 2013
Last Updated: Wednesday, December 04, 2013
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New performance, functionality and ease-of-use benchmarks for nanoscale measurement, characterization and manipulation.

Agilent Technologies Inc. has announced the availability of its 7500 atomic force microscope (AFM), a highly advanced instrument that establishes new performance, functionality and ease-of-use benchmarks for nanoscale measurement, characterization and manipulation.

The Agilent 7500 achieves atomic resolution imaging with its 90 m AFM closed-loop scanner.

The Agilent 7500 is a next-generation platform designed to extend the frontier of atomic force microscopy for academia and industry by offering high resolution and unrivaled environmental and temperature control.

The new 7500 AFM is an ideal solution for forward-looking applications in materials science, life science, polymer science, electrochemistry, electrical characterization and nanolithography.

The 7500 AFM has an integrated environmental chamber that provides an easily accessible, sealed sample compartment totally isolated from the rest of the system.

Humidity and temperature sensors in the chamber track conditions in situ; oxygen and reactive gases can be easily introduced into and purged from the sample chamber.

An optional sample temperature controller for the 7500 allows precise control from -30 C to 250 C, with suitable resolution to match any experimental requirements.

A half-dozen AFM imaging modes are supported by the system's standard nose cone, which can easily be interchanged with specialized nose cones as needed, extending capability.

The 7500 comes with the ability to do advanced imaging and electrochemistry applications. Single-pass nanoscale electrical characterization is achievable via Agilent's exclusive MAC Mode III controller.


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