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Knockdown of long noncoding RNAs in breast cancer
1 Jennii Luu, 2 Jesper Maag, 1 Yanny Handoko, 3 Richard Redvers, 3,4 Robin L. Anderson, 5 Maren M. Gross , 2 Marcel E. Dinger, and 1,3 Kaylene J. Simpson 1 Victorian Centre for Functional Genomics, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre; 2 Genome Informatics, The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, The Garvan Institute of Medical Research; 3 Metastasis Research Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, 4 Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne;

RNAi global collaboration study using Lincode siRNA in a primary screen of tumor and nontumor breast cell lines. Hundreds of lncRNAs are found to affect viability and cell morphology of breast cancer. Presented at Keystone Symposia on Long Noncoding RNAs: From Evolution to Function, Mar 15 - Mar 20, 2015.

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Development of a novel xeno-free medium for feeder-free culture of human stem cells
Annand R; Okuda Y; Inamura M

A new xeno-free medium (ReproXFTM) has been developed for feeder-free culture of stem cells.

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Novel culture medium using a small-molecule agonist of thrombopoetin receptor
Hondo M1; Nishino T2; Inamura M1

ReproHSC medium for the culture of hematopoietic stem cells. facilitates the culture and expansion of CD34+/CD38- cells that retain their HSC properties

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A novel multi-organ microfluidic chip: on the way to the complexity of a living organism
Timur R Samatov, Svetlana A Tonevitskaya, Natalya Pulkova, Evgeny A Tonevitsky

A novel physiologically relevant multi-organ chip is developed capable of culturing up to six different organotypic models integrated into a single microfluidic circuit.

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Continuous Collection of Stem Cells from a Human Placenta Perfusion Co-Culture
John J.S. Cadwell & James C. Hardy

The potential for human placenta-derived cells to produce stem cells in a hollow fiber bioreactor co-culture system was investigated.

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Specificity of highly potent miRNA inhibitors
Barbara Robertson, Andrew Dalby, Yuriy Fedorov, Jon Karpilow, Anastasia Khvorova1, Devin Leake, Annaleen Vermeulen

miRNA inhibitors are invaluable tools for elucidating the roles of miRNAs. However, potent inhibitors may also affect other miRNAs. To understand the potential cross-reactivity of miRNA inhibitors, various miRNA inhibitor designs were systematically tested. We demonstrate that mismatches both within and outside the seed region of the miRNA interfere with inhibition. Our findings indicate that features important for natural miRNA target recognition are also important for inhibitor specificity.

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Alternative miRNA design for therapeutic RNAi applications
Anja van Brabant Smith, Barb Robertson, Annaleen Vermeulen, Christina Yamada, Angela Reynolds, Anastasia Khvorova, Devin Leake

For in vivo applications, the design of miRNA inhibitors and miRNA mimics must be optimized for stability and potency. However, stabilized miRNA mimic molecules can lose functionality compared to standard miRNA mimic molecules due, in part, to the activity of the stabilized passenger strand acting as a miRNA inhibitor. We discuss how mismatches affect the activity of the stabilized miRNA mimics, perhaps by generating a passenger strand that is less functional as an inhibitor molecule.

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Cas9 driven by an optimal promoter improves gene editing in eukaryotic cell lines when paired with synthetic crRNA and tracrRNA
Amanda Haupt, Emily Anderson, Žaklina Strezoska, Hidevaldo Machado, Shawn McClelland, Maren Mayer, Adam Rocker, Annaleen Vermeulen, Amanda Birmingham, Melissa Kelley, Anja Smith

Presented here are results on the efficiency of using synthetic crRNA and tracrRNA to introduce gene editing events when co-transfected with a plasmid expressing Cas9. We explored the use of antibiotic and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) methods for enrichment of cells that have undergone gene editing, and the use of multiple promoters to increase efficiency of gene editing with Cas9 and synthetic tracrRNA and crRNAs.

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Specificity and functionality of microRNA inhibitors
Barbara Robertson, Andrew Dalby, Jon Karpilow, Anastasia Khvorova, Devin Leake and Annaleen Vermeulen

Our findings indicate that features important for natural miRNA target recognition also appear to be important for inhibitor specificity. Understanding the specificity of inhibitors allows for better interpretation of inhibitor activity in endogenous systems.

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Scientific News
Growing Spinal Disc Tissue
Scientists develop new method for growing spinal disc tissue in the lab for combating chronic back pain.
A New Path Towards a Universal Flu Vaccine
New research suggests it may be possible to harness a previously unknown mechanism within the immune system to create more effective and efficient vaccines against this ever-mutating virus.
Potential New Class of Cancer Drugs
Scientists have found a way to stop cancer cell growth by targeting the Warburg Effect, a trait of cancer cell metabolism that scientists have been eager to exploit.
Human Trials of Manufactured Blood Within Two Years
The first human trials of lab-produced blood to help create better-matched blood for patients with complex blood conditions has been announced by NHS Blood and Transplant.
How Anthrax Spores Grow in Cultured Human Tissues
New findings to help predict risk and outcomes of anthrax attacks.
A Patient’s Budding Cortex — In A Dish?
Networking neurons thrive in 3-D human “organoid”
Researchers use Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis to Study Extracellular Vesicles
Scientists are working to find a way deliver a specific microRNA species capable of retarding the growth of tumor cells.
Tiny Spheres Of Human Cells Mimic The Brain
Researchers have figured out how to create spheres of neuronal cells resembling the cerebral cortex, making functional human brain tissue available for the first time to study neuropsychiatric diseases such as autism and schizophrenia.
Study Maps Prenatal Cells
Babies’ sex cells unprotected during pregnancy. Research delivers new data for stem cell scientists to more accurately study infertility.
Bold Steps Toward Engineering New Lungs
ASU researchers are working to improve aspects of lung engineering that may in the future contribute to providing a nearly limitless supply of donor organs, ideally matched to their recipients, or to repairing damaged lungs.
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