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Award-Winning ICS-5000 Reagent-Free Ion Chromatography System

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The Dionex ICS-5000 Reagent-Free™ Ion Chromatography (RFIC™), winner of the Bronze Star in the prestigious GIT Innovations Award 2010, is the world’s first capillary IC system.

The new system combines all the features of other Dionex high-end products with capillary IC into one dual system. Using IC x IC technology in capillary and analytical modes, chemists can now achieve ultralow detection limits without the cost and operational challenges of a mass spectrometer.

Additionally, by using higher linear flow rates and pressure-optimised consumables, the ICS-5000 RFIC system has been optimised for Fast IC, which shortens run times to as low as 3–5 minutes, increasing laboratory throughput by up to four times. As capillary IC requires only 400 nL samples, the ICS-5000 system is an ideal platform for expanding into biological applications, such as metabolomics.

The innovative IC Cube™ module houses all of the capillary consumables in one convenient package, simplifying handling and ensuring minimum dead volumes. The chemically inert flow path withstands pH extremes and protects sensitive samples from metal contamination. With eluent generation and capillary column chemistries, the ICS-5000 provides 3 months of uninterrupted (Always Ready) operation with just 2 L of deionised water, increasing convenience and reducing waste by a hundredfold.

Product Award-Winning ICS-5000 Reagent-Free Ion Chromatography System
Company Dionex Corporation
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Dionex Corporation
1228 Titan Way P.O. Box 3603 Sunnyvale, CA 94088-3603 United States

Tel: +1 408 737 0700
Fax: +1 408 730 9403

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