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Rapid Interconnection, Control and Logging of Multiple Synthesis Reaction Parameters

Published: Monday, October 12, 2009
Last Updated: Monday, October 12, 2009
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New Atlas Six Way Socket connects multiple sensor nodes.

Syrris has introduced the Atlas Six Way Node Socket for its Atlas, high performance, low cost and easy-to-use modular synthesis system. The Atlas Six Way Node Socket facilitates rapid interconnection, control and logging of multiple reaction parameters, making the system even more versatile, quicker to set up and ideal for process optimisation.

Simply plugging into the node port of the intelligent Atlas Base Unit, the new Six Way Node Socket can connect up to six sensor nodes via Node Extensions to the Base Unit. This enables the measurement by various available sensor nodes of multiple parameters, such as temperature, pH and temperature, and turbidity, which can all be displayed, read and controlled directly from the Base Unit. To prevent any confusion, each of the six sensor nodes can be individually named.

All data can be quickly and easily downloaded from the Base Unit to a USB stick in .csv format. For easy graphical analysis of the log files, data can then be imported and viewed in Atlas Reporting Software. Any graph generated can be customized and exported as an image, PDF or .csv file with this innovative, wizard style software.

For further information on the Atlas Six Way Node Socket, Reporting Software, or any of the products in the innovative portfolio of Atlas products such as pH monitoring and control, reaction calorimetry, crystallisation and FT-IR analysis systems

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