Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Crystallography
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Cornell's ERL Research Supports New X-ray Laser

Published: Friday, April 11, 2014
Last Updated: Tuesday, April 15, 2014
Bookmark and Share
Scientists have developed a groundbreaking new synchrotron X-ray technology.

For more than a decade, Cornell scientists have been developing a groundbreaking new synchrotron X-ray technology called the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). A new X-ray laser on the West Coast is taking advantage of their developments.

Now in early planning stages, Stanford University’s Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (formerly Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) is upgrading its Department of Energy free electron laser X-ray. Much of the fundamental technology that will allow them to make the upgrade – the brightness of the X-ray beams and the acceleration system with superconducting surfaces – will be using work done by Cornell accelerator physicists.

“Our work on the ERL has been very important for the proposed accelerator at SLAC,” said Georg Hoffstaetter, professor of physics and principal investigator of the Cornell ERL project.

Stanford plans an X-ray laser in which a highly focused beam of light arrives in strobelike pulses to capture high-resolution images of dynamic processes, including atomic-resolution images of biological molecules like proteins, cell membranes and viruses.

Because the X-rays need to pulse a million times per second, a new way of powering the accelerator and making the X-ray beams had to be designed. In working on the ERL technology, which is closely related to the science of free electron lasers, Cornell researchers devised a way to power a linear accelerator continuously, as opposed to pulsing it on and off.

Led by Hoffstaetter, Cornell scientists have pioneered the production of very narrow electron beams with high currents and the use of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities that are fitted along the accelerator beam pipe. Both technologies are essential for the new X-ray laser: The electron beam must be exceedingly narrow to produce a coherent X-ray beam, and the electrical power to accelerate the beam is kept low by using superconducting surfaces to produce the fields that accelerate the electrons.

“The only way for a linear accelerator to be on all the time is for current in the accelerating structures to flow without loss, and that is what superconductivity achieves,” Hoffstaetter said.

The Stanford X-ray laser will require a continuous beam of electrons to focus on a very narrow spot. Cornell ERL researchers have developed a source of electrons that has unprecedented brightness, meaning it puts the largest possible electron current onto the smallest possible spot.

The ERL that has been designed at Cornell will have an even larger electron current than the upgrade to the LCLS. Accelerating this current would require far more electrical power, if not for the principle of energy recovery that Cornell researchers are using. The energy from the spent beam, after its use for X-ray experiments, is reused to accelerate a new beam – hence, “recovery.” The process requires the accelerator to be on all the time, a problem solved by the low energy loss in the superconducting surfaces of SRF cavities.

With construction expected to start this year at SLAC, the X-ray laser upgrade is projected to begin operating in 2019. Cornell and several other U.S. laboratories are collaborating with SLAC to build the new X-ray laser.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,100+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

'Shield' Gives Tricky Proteins a New Identity
Solubilization of Integral Membrane Proteins with high Levels of Expression.
Saturday, April 11, 2015
Cornell Partners in Structural Biology X-ray Center
Cornell is a partner in a $25 million National Science Foundation award to develop a science and technology center aimed at transforming the field of structural biology.
Monday, November 11, 2013
Weird Science: Crystals Melt when they're Cooled
Scientists from Cornell University study the unusual properties of nanoparticle crystal growth.
Tuesday, May 28, 2013
Using X-rays to Study Ultra-Thin Transistors
Cornell scientists have helped develop a novel process of spreading extremely thin organic transistors, and used synchrotron X-rays to watch how the films crystallize.
Thursday, May 02, 2013
Scientific News
Neutron Analysis of HIV-1 Protease
Neutrons probe structure of enzyme critical to development of next-generation HIV drugs.
Do Germs Cause Type 1 Diabetes?
Germs could play a role in the development of type 1 diabetes by triggering the body’s immune system to destroy the cells that produce insulin, new research suggests.
Crucial Reaction for Vision Revealed
Scientists have tracked the reaction of a protein responding to light, paving the way for a new understanding of life's essential reactions.
Secrets of a Deadly Virus Family Revealed
Scripps Research scientists uncover the glycoprotein structure of LCMV. The findings could guide development of treatments for Lassa fever.
Serotonin Transporter Structure Revealed
Researchers determined the 3-D structure of the serotonin transporter and visualized how two common antidepressants interact with the protein.
Zika Virus Structure Revealed
Team at Purdue becomes the first to determine the structure of the Zika virus, which reveals insights critical to the development of effective antiviral treatments and vaccines.
Half a Million-Dollar Tick
How proteins present in tick saliva prevent the immune system from running amok.
Promising Model for Hantavirus Drug Design
X-ray crystallography provides drug template against disease transmitted by small rodents.
A Crystal Clear View of Biomolecules
Fundamental discovery triggers paradigm shift in crystallography.
'Molecular Movie' Opens Door to New Cancer Treatments
An international team of scientists led by the University of Liverpool has produced a 'structural movie' revealing the step-by-step creation of an important naturally occurring chemical in the body that plays a role in some cancers.
SELECTBIO

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,100+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,500+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!