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Epsilon Imaging® Debuts EchoInsight®, the Industry’s First Software Suite Dedicated to Strain Imaging

Published: Monday, March 26, 2012
Last Updated: Monday, March 26, 2012
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Initial applications include customized applications for stress echo and echocardiography research.

Epsilon Imaging, Inc. has announced the debut of EchoInsight, a suite of applications for practical strain imaging and streamlined workflow in the clinical environment. The Company has also introduced its EchoInsight (Research Version) application for comprehensive strain imaging analysis; clinical applications are emerging from research being conducted with this application. The EchoInsight software platform provides quantitative information on cardiac tissue motion and contraction to assist echocardiography diagnostics, along with workflow-enhancing features. The result is practical strain imaging and streamlined workflow for cardiac patient management.

The Company is showcasing EchoInsight and its initial applications designed exclusively for stress echo and echocardiography research as works-in-progress at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 12 Scientific Sessions, currently underway at McCormick Place in Chicago, IL (Booth 20074). EchoInsight is a 510(k) cleared solution.

Breakthrough Technology in Strain Imaging

EchoInsight is powered by Epsilon Imaging's breakthrough proprietary tissue tracking technology, which can be applied to both speckle and RF data, allowing for robust strain imaging that can be used with studies from virtually any ultrasound system on the market. Initial applications include:

-- EchoInsight for Stress Echo is designed specifically to move strain imaging from research to practical everyday clinical use. This application assists echocardiographers in improving quality, standardization and workflow in stress echo interpretation and reporting. Features include global and regional function measurement, ejection fraction calculation, wall motion vector maps, wall motion scoring and streamlined reporting. Along with delivering all the valuable benefits of strain imaging, EchoInsight for Stress Echo is intuitive and streamlines interpretation and reporting of studies with integration into a customer’s healthcare IT infrastructure

-- EchoInsight (Research Version) offers a comprehensive feature set designed for users that prefer an application that can be customized to fit their echocardiography research needs. Features include visualization and analysis tools for tissue velocity and strain imaging, comparison ability, along with tailored data export.

“We are pleased to introduce EchoInsight to the cardiology community,” said Eric J. Sieczka, president and CEO of Epsilon Imaging. “EchoInsight is a game-changer in strain imaging solutions as a vendor neutral, fast processing and robust platform. Initial applications in the EchoInsight suite include a solution designed with the clinician and their practice workflow in mind with EchoInsight for Stress Echo, as well as a solution for the research community with EchoInsight (Research Version).”

“Over the past 5 years, we have developed EchoInsight, by collaborating with thought leaders, researchers and clinicians in the cardiology community. The feedback we have received and continue to receive from our user group will ensure the delivery of customized applications for the clinical environment with feature sets that exceed expectations. Ultimately, EchoInsight will save users time, while improving confidence and streamlining diagnostic workflow.”
New Approach to Assessment of Diastolic Function

Diastolic dysfunction is a major cause of heart failure, yet current techniques to assess it are limited. At ACC 12, Dr. Theodore J. Kolias, associate professor of cardiology at the University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center, presented “A Novel Technique to Measure Diastolic Function Using a Prototype Speckle Tracking Echocardiography System: Results from the Radiofrequency-based Speckle Tracking Echocardiography to Evaluate Diastolic Function (RF-SPEED) Study.” This study evaluated a novel technique to assess diastolic function developed by investigators at the University of Michigan and Epsilon Imaging, using EchoInsight, and its proprietary tissue tracking technology. The study found that strain rate imaging using this new technique, with higher frame rate acquisition, provided an accurate measure of diastolic function that compared favorably to the current standard of tissue Doppler. Epsilon Imaging’s tissue tracking technology used in the RF-SPEED study is at the core of the EchoInsight platform.

“Epsilon Imaging algorithms for strain rate analysis, along with high frame rate image acquisition, have significant potential to assist echocardiographers in improving diagnostic assessment of diastolic dysfunction,” said Theodore J. Kolias, MD of the University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center.

Sieczka added, “Based on Dr. Kolias’ research presented at ACC 12, a clinical application designed specifically for the interpretation of diastolic function is a natural next step for the EchoInsight application suite.”

About Strain Imaging

Strain Imaging can provide repeatable assessment of regional heart mechanics and consistent global functional parameters (EF and global strain). This added information can reduce interpretation time on the visually demanding cases and increase confidence for experienced and novice readers. Quantification of tissue motion and contraction can also reduce variability between readers. Strain imaging has been shown to have clinical value for other applications such as heart failure, cardio-oncology, cardiomyopathies, and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT).


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