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Wako Life Sciences Receives AACC Award

Published: Tuesday, February 04, 2014
Last Updated: Tuesday, February 04, 2014
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Dr. Shinji Satomura and Dr. Henry Wada receives the award for the uTASWako i30 Immunoanalyzer.

Dr. Shinji Satomura, President, and Dr. Henry Wada, CSO of Wako Life Sciences, Inc., received an award from the Northern California Section of AACC for the scientific and technology contribution to clinical chemistry achieved by the development of the uTASWako i30 Immunoanalyzer.

"Wako is happy to receive this award for the uTASWako i30 Immunoanalyzer which was the first application of Lab-on-a-Chip technology on an IVD instrument."

The uTASWako i30 has enabled miniaturization and integration of key analyzer processes for the sampling, mixing, separation and detection of serum biomarkers in a cost effective microfluidic chip.

The system uses immunochemical and electrophoretic techniques to achieve rapid, accurate, precise and sensitive assay results. The first test result is obtained in nine (9) minutes from starting the measurement; results thereafter are 2 minutes each.

As a bench-top automated instrument, the μTASWako i30 is designed for efficiency and ease-of-use in a clinical laboratory setting. With the features of automated calibration and quality control, the uTASWako i30 requires minimal setup time.

"We acknowledge the technical achievement of the team of Scientists and Engineers at Wako Life Sciences, Inc. and Wako Pure Chemical Industries, Ltd., who married the benefits of microfluidics with the requirements of the IVD market in order to bring this product to the clinical laboratory," said Henry Wada, CSO of Wako Life Sciences, Inc.

uTASWako i30 is currently available in the USA, Canada, Japan and Europe for the serum biomarkers lectin-reactive alpha-fetoprotein (AFP-L3) and des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) tests.

The AFP-L3 and DCP tests are intended for in vitro diagnostic use as an aid in the risk assessment of patients with chronic liver disease for development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in conjunction with other laboratory findings, imaging studies and clinical assessment.


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