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A Synthetic CRISPR-Cas9 System for Homology-directed Repair
John A. Schiel, Maren M. Gross, Emily M. Anderson*, Eldon T. Chou, Anja van Brabant Smith Dharmacon, part of GE Healthcare, 2650 Crescent Drive, Lafayette, CO 80026, USA

Synthetic, dual-RNA-encoded Cas9 is used for precise homology-directed repair (HDR) gene engineering. Both short and long (GFP) inserts are covered.

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Deep Phenotyping - Harnessing Data Richness for Unsupervised High-Content Analysis
Huang Dong, Wang Yi, Maciej Hermanowicz, Ke Yiping, Maja Choma, Lee Kee Khoon, Frederic Bard

Recognising the key challenges, we develop an end-to-end computational framework for HCA dubbed “Deep Phenotyping” that perform unsupervised analysis to leverage on the data richness for the discovery of unknown sub-phenotypes with minimal labeling cost.

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Clinical Applications of “Liquid biopsy” in the Colorectal Cancer Treatmen
Koichi Suzuki, Yuji Takayama, Kosuke Ichida, Taro Fukui, Nao Kakizawa, Fumiaki Watanabe, Fumi Hasegawa, Rina Kikugawa, Shingo Tsujinaka, Yasuyuki Miyakura, Toshiki Rikiyama

Liquid biopsy provides a circulating biomarker not only for treatment response but decision making of a sequential strategy.

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Finite element modelling for the optimization of temperature control in Lab-on-a-Chip devices
T. Pardy(a,b); T. Rang(a); I. Tulp(b)

The presented finite element model aims to help in the development of Lab-on-a-Chip devices which require temperature control. The model simulates the thermal system in such devices to enable in silico validation of designs and geometry optimization, and aims to be a versatile tool supporting multiple temperature control methods.

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Development of an Integrated Paper-based Molecular Diagnostic Platform
Manoharanehru Branavan, Wamadeva Balachandran

The poster describes a modular development of a paper-based molecular diagnostic device and the latest results obtained from a proof-of-concept device.

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Differences in the Neurophysiology of Infants with Down Syndrome May Predict Protective/Risk Markers for Subsequent Alzheimer’s Disease
Esha Massand1,2, Hana D’Souza1,2, George Ball1,2, Maria Eriksson1, Charlotte Dennison1, Joanna Ball1 & Annette Karmiloff-Smith1,2

Our work set out to understand early individual differences in memory abilities of infants with DS that may be predictive of subsequent cognitive phenotypes of AD.

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The Challenges of Genetic Testing in Patients Diagnosed with Breast Cancer; The Kent Oncology Centre Experience
Christos Mikropoulos1,2, Aaron Davies 1, Charlotte Abson1, Gill Sadler1, Gemma McCormick1, Questa Karlsson2, Julia Hall2

In this study we explore retrospective data to determine strategies for optimizing the genetic referral pathways for breast cancer.

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Translational Research of oral Neural Crest-Derived Stem Cells (oNCSCs) in Regenerative Dentistry
Grimm W.-D1,2,4, S. N. Alekseenko9, D. V. Bobryshev1, W. Duncan11, B. Giesenhagen3, E. Gubareva9, Sema S. Hakki6, O.V. Pershina7, I. Schau4, S. V. Sirak1, E.G. Skurikhin7, A. A. Sletov1, F. Witte10, G. Varga8, O. V. Vladimirova1, M.A. Vukovic2, D. Widera5

In this review poster, we summarize current knowledge on the oral neural crest-derived stem cell populations (oNCSCs) and discuss their potential in regenerative periodontology as a part of regenerative dentistry.

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Building a digital pathology ecosystem for education and research
Yves Sucaet, Silke Smeets, Stijn Piessens, Sabrina D'Haese, Chris Groven, Wim Waelput, Peter In't Veld

We wanted to build a core digital pathology infrastructure to support different use cases. Various images platforms needed to be accessible through a single access point, and support different user profiles. We wanted a scalable solution that would allow interaction between equipment from different research groups.
We built a centralized infrastructure that integrates a variety of imaging platforms, and now have an interconnected network of heterogeneous and scalable information silos.

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Scientific News
Some Women With PCOS May Have Adrenal Disorder
Researchers at NIH have found that a subgroup of women with PCOS, a leading cause of infertility, may produce excess adrenal hormones.
Faster Detection of Pathogens in the Lungs
Thanks to new molecular-based methods, mycobacterial pathogens that cause pulmonary infections or tuberculosis can now be detected much more quickly.
Proteins in Blood of Heart Disease Patients May Predict Adverse Events
Nine-protein test shown superior to conventional assessments of risk.
£14m EU Project To Aid Meningitis Diagnosis and Cut Antibiotic Use
An international team of doctors are aiming to develop a rapid test to allow medics to quickly identify bacterial infection in children.
Bringing AFM to Medical Diagnostics
Company has announced that its NanoWizard® AFM and ForceRobot® systems are being used in the field of medical diagnostics in the Supersensitive Molecular Layer Laboratory of POSTECH in Korea.
Scientific Gains May Make Electronic Nose the Next Everyday Device
UT Dallas team breathes new life into possibilities by using CMOS integrated circuits technology.
Electronic Sensor Tells Dead Bacteria From Live
The sensor, which measures 'osmoregulation', is a potential future tool for medicine and food safety.
Diagnosing Systemic Infections Quickly, Reliably
Team develop rapid and specific diagnostic assay that could help physicians decide within an hour whether a patient has a systemic infection and should be hospitalized for aggressive intervention therapy.
A Future Tool for Medicine, Food Safety
A new type of electronic sensor that might be used to quickly detect and classify bacteria for medical diagnostics and food safety has passed a key hurdle by distinguishing between dead and living bacteria cells.
Genome Sequencing Helps Determine End of TB Outbreak
Using genome sequencing, researchers from the University of British Columbia, along with colleagues at the Imperial College in London, now have the ability to determine when a tuberculosis (TB) outbreak is over.
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