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Point-of-Care Diagnostics for Sexually Transmitted Infections
Pascal Craw, Wamadeva Balachandran

This poster introduces the recently enlarged DoCLab research group at Brunel University, London. This large multidisciplinary group brings together electronic, mechanical and computer engineers with molecular biologists, biochemists and clinical collaborators to develop fully integrated, multiplex Point-Of-Care-Tests (POCT) for the self- diagnosis of infectious diseases.

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Optical Microchip Sensors for Multiplexed Detection of Biological Pathogens
D. Bhatta, A. Michel, M. Marti Villalba, G. D. Emmerson, I. J. G Sparrow, M. B. McDonnell, E. A. Perkins , R. W. Ely and G. A. Cartwright

SpectroSens, a multi-channel optical microchip sensor system suitable for rapid, label-free multiplexed detection of a wide range of bio-hazardous agents is presented. Optical chips containing multiple high-precision planar Bragg gratings are exploited as low-cost, robust refractive index sensors.

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SuNS microarray as novel biosensor for clinical diagnostics.
Pisanelli B., Dattilo D., Chetta M., Carducci F., De Ceglia G.

We here present an innovative microarray platform which aims to produce an higher standard of clinical microarray technology. The fabrication approach, involving a novel printing technology (Supramolecular Nano-Stamping) to reduce the production costs of the chips, together with a peculiar probe design, aiming to improve the assay sensitivity and workflow, intend to make the SuNS microarrays well poised to become an important element in the clinical diagnostics market.

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Bi-functional Magnetic Microcarriers for Point-of-Care Diagnostics
J.J. Palfreyman, D.M. Love, A.J. Philpott, K. Vyas, T. Mitrelias, C.H.W. Barnes

A novel type of microcarrier is presented, where a re-writable magnetic barcode is used to carry information. This technology has several advantages over the optical-based alternatives, whilst benefiting from the high-throughput of a microfluidic tool. Here, we present two different surface chemistries used to attach a probe and a control strand of DNA to an individual microcarrier. This is demonstrated with red and green fluorophores, clearly seen on either side.

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Chemically Modified Primers for Improved Multiplex PCR
Elena Hidalgo Ashrafi, Tony Le, Alexandre Lebedev, Richard Hogrefe, Victor Timoshchuk, Sabrina Shore, Inna Koukhareva and Natasha Paul

Multiplex PCR is an advantageous technique used in PCR applications to amplify multiple targets in a single reaction. As useful as it is, this technique presents a new set of challenges that further complicates PCR setup. For example, reactions are more prone to off-target amplifications such as mis-priming and primer dimer due to the increased number of primer pairs.

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Proteomic non-small cell lung carcinoma biomarker screening in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid
Tonio Oumeraci 1, Bernd Schmidt 3, Thomas Wolf 1,4, Marc Zapatka 4, Andreas Pich 2, Benedikt Brors 4, Roland Eils 4,5, Brigitte Schlegelberger 1, Nils von Neuhoff 1

Using a standardized method to acquire MALDI-TOF proteome profile spectra of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), we have shown the upregulation of histatin 3 and calgranulin C in a small pilot cohort of NSCLC patients. This pilot study serves to demonstrate that it is feasible to screen a larger NSCLC patient cohort for BALF proteome level biomarkers in a clinical setting.

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Chemically Modified Primers for Improved Multiplexed PCR
Elena Hidalgo Ashrafi, Tony Le, Alexandre Lebedev, Richard Hogrefe, Victor Timoshchuk, Sabrina Shore, Inna Koukhareva and Natasha Paul

Multiplex PCR is an advantageous technique used in PCR applications to amplify multiple targets in a single reaction. As useful as it is, this technique presents a new set of challenges that further complicates PCR setup. For example, reactions are more prone to off-target amplifications such as mis-priming and primer dimer due to the increased number of primer pairs. Furthermore, preferential amplification of certain targets leads to an unequal distribution of amplicon products, making quantifi

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Hot Start dNTPs - A Novel Tool for Controlled Nucleotide Incorporation in PCR
Tony Le, Elena Hidalgo Ashrafi, Sabrina Shore, Victor Timoshchuk, Natasha Paul, Richard Hogrefe, Inna Koukhareva, Alexandre Lebedev

PCR is a widely used scientific tool employed by a variety of applications. Various Hot Start technologies have already been developed using modified PCR components to increase specificity of a reaction. Recently developed CleanAmpTM dNTPs are modified nucleoside triphosphates with a thermolabile 3’-tetrahydrofuranyl protecting group that is released at higher temperatures. These modified dNTPs prevent low temperature primer extension, which can often be a significant problem in PCR. At higher t

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Evaluation of microfluidic digital PCR for the detection of cancer biomarkers
Rebecca Sanders, Claire Bushell, Carole Foy, Daniel J. Scott

dPCR is achieved by sample partitioning prior to PCR amplification such that each reaction chamber contains one copy or less of target DNA. This dilution becomes the limiting factor and an accurate target molecule count is achievable. This study evaluates dPCR’s quantitative capabilities and investigates parameters influencing copy number quantification, using the Fluidigm Biomark instrument. Biomark technology combines dPCR theory with a microfluidics platform.

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Scientific News
‘Smelling’ Prostate Cancer
A research team from the University of Liverpool and the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol) has reached an important milestone towards creating a urine diagnostic test for prostate cancer that could mean that invasive diagnostic procedures that men currently undergo eventually become a thing of the past.
Criminal Justice Alcohol Program Linked to Decreased Mortality
Institute has announced that in the criminal justice alcohol program deaths dropped by 4.2 percent over six years.
Charting Kidney Cancer Metabolism
Changes in cell metabolism are increasingly recognized as an important way tumors develop and progress, yet these changes are hard to measure and interpret. A new tool designed by MSK scientists allows users to identify metabolic changes in kidney cancer tumors that may one day be targets for therapy.
Individuals' Medical Histories Predicted by their Noncoding Genomes
Researchers have found that analyzing mutations in regions of the genome that control genes can predict medical conditions such as hypertension, narcolepsy and heart problems.
'Molecular Movie' Opens Door to New Cancer Treatments
An international team of scientists led by the University of Liverpool has produced a 'structural movie' revealing the step-by-step creation of an important naturally occurring chemical in the body that plays a role in some cancers.
Advancing Synthetic Biology
Living systems rely on a dizzying variety of chemical reactions essential to development and survival. Most of these involve a specialized class of protein molecules — the enzymes.
Preparing for Potential Zika Outbreaks
Experts at the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) are developing tools to monitor the spread of the Zika virus and are conducting research to gather more solid data to better assess the risks associated with the infection.
What do Banana Peels and Human Skin Have in Common?
Human skin and banana peels have something in common: they produce the same enzyme when attacked. By studying fruit, researchers have come up with an accurate method for diagnosing the stages of this form of skin cancer.
Biomarker for Recurring HPV-Linked Oropharyngeal Cancers
A look-back analysis of HPV infection antibodies in patients treated for oropharyngeal (mouth and throat) cancers linked to HPV infection suggests at least one of the antibodies could be useful in identifying those at risk for a recurrence of the cancer, say scientists at the Johns Hopkins University.
Counting Cancer-busting Oxygen Molecules
Researchers from the Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP), an Australian Research Centre of Excellence, have shown that nanoparticles used in combination with X-rays, are a viable method for killing cancer cells deep within the living body.
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