Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Environmental Analysis
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

British Scientist Develops Plumber-Fitted Monitoring System for Water Bacteria Analysis

Published: Monday, July 30, 2012
Last Updated: Monday, July 30, 2012
Bookmark and Share
Following a heightened risk of water contamination, one British scientist has developed a sensor that measures bacteria levels in tap water.

Taking just thirty minutes for any plumber to fit, his invention is now going into commercial production.

Supplies of clean and safe drinking water are vital to the sustainability of good health. Now, thanks to an invention by a British scientific professional organization, detecting traces of bacteria in tap water distribution systems is easier than ever before, as the unit goes into commercial production.

Professor Bill Keevil, Director of the Microbiology department at Southampton University, invited Monitoring System to demonstrate the sensor technology in a laboratory setting.   The device was able to detect and measure benign bacteria.  Following this, Monitoring Systems joined a consortium  funded by an EC Research Project named  SecurEau.

With this success,  Monitoring Systems Limited and began work on producing a prototype of a microbial sensor that was capable of detecting and monitoring the volume of bacteria flowing in tap water.  The prototype was tested at Southampton University was able to monitor the levels of two  samples of E.Coli.

Since this time, Monitoring Systems has produced an industrial variant which has been acquired by MOLECSEN Ltd, the company who will be manufacturing and selling the system worldwide.   The first product is a Turbidity Monitor, giving process engineers a device that can be installed by plumbers. The sensor is self-calibrating and extremely low maintenance.

In essence, the sensor is a tube which is inserted in a pipeline and connected to a display unit which also powers the sensor. This touch screen display is available in a wide range of attractive styles can suit any layout. Options allow for a graph, alarm system and data logging.

Nigel Baxter, CEO of MOLECSEN, believes that the unit has a vast range of applications.

“The Turbidity Monitor can be inserted into a tap water pipeline which is non-invasive, does not require calibration, and does not call for much servicing. Industry has had to depend on  only one method, the optical unit for the measurement of Turbidity,   expensive to use, and maintain, but there is no choice but to use it. The technology offers immediate cost savings in industrial processes,” he explains.

Monitoring Systems,and the team at MOLECSEN are continuing to test, refine and improve on their technology. With so many different applications for their sensors, new uses are being discovered every day.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,300+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,900+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
Soil Nitrogen Age Important for Precision Agriculture
Calculating the age of nitrogen in corn and soybean fields could lead to improved fertilizer application techniques.
Safe CO2 Storage Viable Following Tests
Successful trials in Australia have led to the discovery of an inexpensive method of stored CO2 monitoring underground.
Phosphorous Pollution Remains Major Issue
Phosphorus pollution of lakes is a major problem. Researchers now look to improve the state of the lakes, otherwise freshwater quality will suffer.
Detecting Pesticides, Nerve Gas With an Electronic Nose
Detecting pesticides and nerve gas in very low concentrations? An international team of researchers led by Ivo Stassen and Rob Ameloot from KU Leuven have made it possible.
Carbon Capture Breakthrough
Chemists from the University of York have developed a new, green, CO2 capture system with a focus around reducing large scale emissions.
Massive Helium Discovery a "Game Changer" for Medical Industry
A new development is gas exploration has yielded the discovery of a huge helium gas field, which could help relieve the dwindling supply.
NASA Study Explains Sea Ice Differences at Poles
NASA-led study uses satellite and environmental data to shed light on differences in sea ice formation between Arctic and Antarctic.
Wireless, Wearable Toxic-Gas Detector
Inexpensive sensors could be worn by soldiers to detect hazardous chemical agents.
Tracking The Aluminum Used To Purify Tap Water
Kobe University researchers demonstrate a new analysis method to measure the concentration of aluminium used to purify tap water.
Electronic Sensor Tells Dead Bacteria From Live
The sensor, which measures 'osmoregulation', is a potential future tool for medicine and food safety.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,300+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,900+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!