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British Scientist Develops Plumber-Fitted Monitoring System for Water Bacteria Analysis

Published: Monday, July 30, 2012
Last Updated: Monday, July 30, 2012
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Following a heightened risk of water contamination, one British scientist has developed a sensor that measures bacteria levels in tap water.

Taking just thirty minutes for any plumber to fit, his invention is now going into commercial production.

Supplies of clean and safe drinking water are vital to the sustainability of good health. Now, thanks to an invention by a British scientific professional organization, detecting traces of bacteria in tap water distribution systems is easier than ever before, as the unit goes into commercial production.

Professor Bill Keevil, Director of the Microbiology department at Southampton University, invited Monitoring System to demonstrate the sensor technology in a laboratory setting.   The device was able to detect and measure benign bacteria.  Following this, Monitoring Systems joined a consortium  funded by an EC Research Project named  SecurEau.

With this success,  Monitoring Systems Limited and began work on producing a prototype of a microbial sensor that was capable of detecting and monitoring the volume of bacteria flowing in tap water.  The prototype was tested at Southampton University was able to monitor the levels of two  samples of E.Coli.

Since this time, Monitoring Systems has produced an industrial variant which has been acquired by MOLECSEN Ltd, the company who will be manufacturing and selling the system worldwide.   The first product is a Turbidity Monitor, giving process engineers a device that can be installed by plumbers. The sensor is self-calibrating and extremely low maintenance.

In essence, the sensor is a tube which is inserted in a pipeline and connected to a display unit which also powers the sensor. This touch screen display is available in a wide range of attractive styles can suit any layout. Options allow for a graph, alarm system and data logging.

Nigel Baxter, CEO of MOLECSEN, believes that the unit has a vast range of applications.

“The Turbidity Monitor can be inserted into a tap water pipeline which is non-invasive, does not require calibration, and does not call for much servicing. Industry has had to depend on  only one method, the optical unit for the measurement of Turbidity,   expensive to use, and maintain, but there is no choice but to use it. The technology offers immediate cost savings in industrial processes,” he explains.

Monitoring Systems,and the team at MOLECSEN are continuing to test, refine and improve on their technology. With so many different applications for their sensors, new uses are being discovered every day.

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