Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Environmental Analysis
Scientific Community
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article

Scientists at the Chinese Academy of Sciences Use the Linkam CAP500 Heating Stage

Published: Thursday, October 31, 2013
Last Updated: Wednesday, October 30, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Use of CAP500 stage for extreme deep sea research at SIDSSE.

Linkam Scientific Instruments, report on the use of their innovative CAP500 heating stage for geological research at the new Sanya Institute of Deep-sea Science and Engineering (SIDSSE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

Founded in 1956, The Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences is devoted to scientific investigation and research on basic, hydro, environmental, and karst geology.

Further areas of interest are exploration geophysics and geochemistry; rock and mineral analysis; and efficient mineral resources utilization.

A new modern hydrothermal laboratory is being built as part of the new Sanya Institute of Deep-sea Science and Engineering (SIDSSE), a division of the Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences.

Dr I-Ming Chou, a leading scientist behind the creation of the SIDSSE laboratory, and his colleagues are using the CAP500 stage to conduct experimental studies of extreme deep-sea conditions.

He said: "the sea floor is a frontier for current and future human exploration. The recent successful dive of manned submersible Jiaolong at the depth of 7062m was one of the major scientific achievements of China. This accomplishment provided us with great opportunities for exploring the sea floor, especially the hadal zones that have previously been inaccessible to us. This will facilitate important new research and establish hadal sciences in China. We will also be able to explore and study the life, environments, and geodynamics at the deepest part of the Earth's surface, as well as to formulate possible models for the geological processes that occurred or will occur beneath the sea floor."

To further their geological research the scientists are using the prototype Linkam CAP500 stage. The CAP500 system can control up to 50mm of quartz capillary at high pressure (600bar) from -196°C to 500°C.

In relation to the stage Dr Chou said: "We are beta testing this system with a number of different labs at the moment. Sample temperatures are controlled using a T95 controller with a T95 LinkPad and LNP95 cooling system through Linksys32 temperature control and video capture software. A capillary tube of HPOC can be inserted into a channel (1mm wide and 0.6mm deep) of a silver block (20mm x 50mm). Optical cells have fused silica windows for the study of geological fluids. A small aperture through the centre of the stage, allows samples to be viewed with transmitted light while its design minimizes the temperature gradient along its length."

Dr Chou noted: "The simulated pressure-temperature conditions we can create using the CAP500 will cover hydrothermal vents, hadal zones, and trenches (from 1 to 400°C and up to 600bar). A major advantage of the high-pressure optical cells is the transparency of its windows. This allows the in situ observations and spectroscopic analyses of the samples, and continuous recording during experiments for later review. Using optical cells allows us to not only observe many geological processes at higher P-T conditions, but also characterize geological samples in the cells by using advanced spectroscopic tools, including Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray spectroscopy. Optical cells with fused silica windows are particularly suitable for the study of organic systems and for systems containing sulphur. Furthermore, fluid standards with known composition and pressure can be prepared in these types of cells for quantitative Raman analyses of either natural or synthetic fluids."

When asked about the stage, Dr Chou said: "the stage has the following advantages for the study of geological fluids at P-T conditions up to 500°C and 600bar: it has (1) fluid samples which are easy to load; (2) greater Raman signal intensity; (3) sample pressures which can be measured directly when the HPOC is used; and is (4) easy to operate; and (5) less expensive than other systems on the market."

Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 5,100+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters

Sign In

Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Scientific News
Achieving “Green” Desalination
Workshop explores ways to reduce or eliminate the carbon footprint of seawater desalination plants.
Adapt, Move or Die in Coral Reefs
As oceans warm, coral reef fish might prefer to move rather than adapt, research suggests.
Desalinated Sea Water Linked to Iodine Deficiency Disorders
Study suggests that desalination can dramatically increase the prevalence of inadequate iodine intake.
Reclaim from the Drain - The Importance of Water Reuse
This infographic explains the importance of reusing water to meet the world's increasing water demand.
Carbon Dioxide Levels Pass Troubling Milestone
Carbon dioxide levels are not set to fall below 400ppm for the first time since the Ice Age.
Ice Cores Reveal Decline in Atmospheric Oxygen Over Last 800,000 Years
Researchers have compiled decades of data to produce a record of atmospheric oxygen concentrations.
Ocean Plastic Pollution Worse Than Expected
The Ocean Cleanup concludes first-ever reconnaissance flight over ‘Great Pacific Garbage Patch’.
3D-Printing in Science: Conference Co-Staged with LABVOLUTION
LABVOLUTION 2017 will have an added highlight of a simultaneous conference, "3D-Printing in Science".
Pinpointing Sources of Water Contamination
Lab develops better method of environmental monitoring using the PhyloChip, finds surprising results in Russian River watershed.
Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria In America's Water System
Antibiotic resistant bacteria live inside drinking water distribution systems blamed for rising healthcare costs.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,100+ scientific videos