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New Improved Thermoelectrically Cooled MPPC for Photon Counting Applications

Published: Tuesday, December 24, 2013
Last Updated: Monday, December 23, 2013
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New S12576-050 and S12577-050 multi-pixel photon counter devices from Hamamatsu.

Hamamatsu Photonics have expanded and improved on their range of semi-conductor detectors, featuring photon counting capability, with the introduction of the brand new S12576-050 and S12577-050 multi-pixel photon counter devices (MPPC).

The new devices utilize a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode structure for ultra-low-level light detection, and a two-stage thermoelectric cooler, operating down to -25°C.

The inclusion of a TE cooler reduces the MPPC dark count to 1/20 of that seen at room temperature, equating to 5cps typ. for the S12576-050 and 50cps typ. for the S12577-050.

The MPPC is easily connected to an external circuit for simple operation and is operated from a low voltage power supply (approximately 65 Volts).

Hamamatsu also offers a temperature controller which maintains a constant temperature within the thermoelectrically cooled package.

The S12576-050 and S12577-050 are 1x1mm and 3x3mm devices respectively, with 400 and 3,600 pixels. Each pixel contains a quenching resistor so that simultaneous photon events can be counted separately and, with a high degree of accuracy. The devices feature typical high gain values of 1.25E6, comparable to that achievable from a conventional photomultiplier tube.

The S12576-050 and S12577-050 are ideal for a variety of applications, including positron emission tomography, high-energy physics, DNA sequencing, fluorescence measurement, nuclear medicine, point of care systems, drug discovery, medical diagnostic equipment and environmental analysis.


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