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NanoKTN Announces Details of Next NanoFood Focus Group Event

Published: Wednesday, September 12, 2012
Last Updated: Wednesday, September 12, 2012
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NanoKTN workshop looks at use of novel technologies to improve shelf-life of food.

The Nanotechnology Knowledge Transfer Network has announced details of its next NanoFood focus group event, co-hosted with the Biosciences KTN and Leatherhead Food Research, which will showcase current developments in novel technologies, including nanotechnology, which are solving challenges faced by the food industry.

The workshop will bring experts in packaging, processing and shelf-life testing together with manufacturers and retailers to review and debate how novel and nano-enabled technologies can be used to predict, monitor and facilitate extensions in the shelf-life of food.

Food sustainability and cost-effectiveness are high on the strategic agenda and understanding and managing the shelf-life of food is critical to ensuring both quality and profitability.

The development of novel technologies has been identified by the EU as one of the main solutions to the sustainability of food for the future.

This one-day workshop will look at some of the applications being developed including active packaging, and intelligent and smart packaging which incorporates sensors to monitor the condition of the food.

Impact of Novel Technologies on Shelf-Life of Food will see presentations from leading industry professionals including the Packaging Society, SAB Miller, Anacail, Campden BRI, Advanced Microwave Technologies, Binder, Leatherhead Food Research, Interactive Product Solutions, CPI and the University of Chester.

Persis Subramaniam from Leatherhead Food Research will set the scene by presenting an overview of the reasons why the industry uses shelf-life testing using results from recent research as examples.

Nicole Patterson also from Leatherhead will present some consumer views on novel technologies giving a different but useful perspective on the implementation of novel technologies in foods.

Speakers from industry will include Binder who manufacture environmental storage testing equipment and are developing new technologies for this area, as well as University-led new technologies including novel sensors.

Keith Barnes at the Packaging Society will look at the use of packaging materials dosed with additives and how these and plastic laminate layers can help increase shelf life.

Barnes will also look at the use of category label technology and how this can be used to show ripeness levels, defrosting indication and the ingress of other contaminants.

Edyta Margas, Campden BRI will provide an overview of other new and emerging technologies which could potentially extend the shelf-life of food products and will include examples of practical studies carried out at Campden BRI.

The technologies discussed will include: pulsed light, high pressure processing, modified atmosphere packaging, pulsed electric fields etc. The overview will contain an explanation of basic principles, applications, benefits and limitations.

“More and more we are hearing about the need for food to stay fresher for longer, whilst maintaining consistent characteristics in terms of texture, colour and taste and also whilst still being healthy, safe and value for money. With increasing pressures on the food industry, events like these are crucial to ensure we facilitate communication between all aspects of the supply chain,” explains Dr Barry Park, Theme Manager at the NanoKTN.

Park continues, “Through a number of talks from leading industry professionals, this workshop will highlight some of the ways nanotechnology is solving issues faced by the food industry. We recommend that anyone working in the food supply chain including retailers, food manufacturers, and product developers attends the event.”

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