Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Food & Beverage Analysis
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Grant Will Help Reduce Incidence of Johne's Disease in Dairy Cows

Published: Tuesday, January 08, 2013
Last Updated: Tuesday, January 08, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Dangerous bacterium in milk could also be linked to Crohn’s disease in humans.

Every day, more than 16 million gallons of milk are consumed in the United States. However, despite the technology and safety standards in place, some of that milk contains a nasty bacterium that is linked to Johne's disease in cattle and possibly Crohn's disease in people.

A new $500,000 grant over five years from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture will allow Cornell researchers to continue their research to identify the bacterium in milk, determine risk factors for milk contamination and document recommended intervention strategies to make milk safer.

The bacterium, known as Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis or MAP, incites an infection in ruminant animals that takes about four years to show clinical signs. In the meantime, dairy cows typically have had two calves during that period that may have contracted the infection from their mothers and have produced thousands of gallons of milk headed for store shelves. Recent studies have shown that MAP in milk can survive pasteurization, which has raised human health concerns due to the widespread nature of MAP in modern dairy herds.

Once MAP has infiltrated a herd, the cows are widely susceptible to Johne's disease, which is contagious, chronic and often fatal in cases of clinical disease. The disease is blamed for up to $250 million in annual losses to the U.S. dairy industry.

The new grant will build on the results of the current $2.5 million project, which has been under way since 2009.

The researchers are in the midst of a nine-year longitudinal study to gather DNA from four generations of cows and bacteria, said Ynte Schukken, principal investigator and professor of epidemiology and herd health at Cornell's College of Veterinary Medicine.

"Our study covers the entire spectrum, with data and samples collected from the field cultured in the lab, and bacteria and host DNA sequenced using the most modern genomic methods," Schukken said. "Because of this unparalleled nine-year data set, we have the potential to unravel the mysteries of Johne's disease, a very slow-going and devastating infection on dairy farms."

The researchers, which includes Cornell's Yrjo Grohn, professor of population medicine and diagnostic science, and scientists from Penn State University, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Maryland, will:

•    validate the use of a current test used to identify MAP;
•    analyze data from two herds with a known MAP infection prevalence and cross-sectional data from 300 dairy herds with the complete range of MAP infection prevalence, focusing on the relationship between management practices and MAP contamination of milk;
•    develop risk assessment models that explain and predict MAP contamination of raw milk; and
•    use models they have developed to design optimal sustainable MAP-free milk programs.

Schukken's investigation will extend prior results that have already explained transmission patterns of MAP at the molecular level, developed mathematical models for predicting transmission, devised control programs and monitored those programs' success rates.

"Our immediate goal is to provide dairy farmers with the tools they need to produce milk that is free of MAP bacteria," said Schukken. "Evidence from previous work we've done proves that a high percentage of dairy farms in the U.S. have MAP-infected cattle, so reducing viable MAP in raw and pasteurized milk is of importance. First for the health and well-being of the cows, but also, because of the possible connections to Crohn's disease, for the health and well-being of people."


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,200+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,700+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Eating Green Could be in Your Genes
Genetic variation uncovered that has evolved in populations that have historically favored vegetarian diets, such as in India, Africa and parts of East Asia.
Friday, April 01, 2016
$4.8M USAID Grant to Improve Food Security
To strengthen capacity to develop and disseminate genetically engineered eggplant in Bangladesh and the Philippines, the USAID has awarded Cornell a $4.8 million, three-year cooperative grant.
Friday, April 01, 2016
On Planes, Savory Tomato Becomes Favored Flavor
Study shows the effect that airplane noise has on passengers' taste preferences.
Friday, May 15, 2015
On the Environmental Trail of Food Pathogens
Learning where Listeria dwells can aid the search for other food pathogens.
Tuesday, December 23, 2014
Ingested Nanoparticles May Damage Liver
Although nanoparticles in food, sunscreen and other everyday products have many benefits, researchers from Cornell are finding that at certain doses, the particles might cause human organ damage.
Tuesday, August 12, 2014
Foodborne Pathogen Detection Speeds Up Dramatically
Next-generation sequencing techniques allow rapidly identification of strains of salmonella, quickening responses to potential outbreaks.
Monday, July 21, 2014
Dairy Farmers Should Alternate Pesticides to Kill Flies
Flies spread disease and a host of pathogens that cost farms hundreds of millions of dollars in annual losses.
Thursday, June 26, 2014
New York Secures $3.4M to Bolster Food Research
Funds will go toward the $13M needed to modernize the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Pilot Plant, Phase I of the proposed $47M Agricultural Science Research Laboratory project.
Thursday, June 26, 2014
Cornell University at Forefront of Dairy Safety Outreach
Cornell’s Food Science Dairy Extension Program faculty and professionals are helping New York cheesemakers and dairy producers provide safe, high-quality products for consumers.
Friday, June 13, 2014
Paving the Way for Better Dietary Zinc Test
Cornell research unveils a new method to test for zinc deficiency, a vital measurement that has posed problems for doctors and scientists.
Friday, April 11, 2014
Senator to Tout Cornell Food Safety, Dairy Expertise to Feds
Cornell University is positioned to be a national center of excellence in dairy and food safety.
Monday, September 09, 2013
New Method Makes Puffed Rice Pop with More Nutrients
Puffed rice just got more snap, crackle and pop, thanks to a new method for making puffed rice that retains nutrients and allows producers to fortify cereals with vitamins and protein.
Wednesday, March 20, 2013
Green Food Labels Make Nutrition-Poor Food Seem Healthy
Consumers to perceive a candy bar as more healthful when it has a green calorie label compared to a red one.
Tuesday, March 12, 2013
Changes in Epigenome Control Tomato Ripening
Everyone loves a juicy, perfectly ripened tomato, and scientists have long sought ways to control the ripening process to improve fruit quality and prevent spoilage.
Wednesday, January 30, 2013
Tracing Foodborne Pathogens on the Farm
Remote sensing, microbiology used to trace foodborne pathogens.
Thursday, December 06, 2012
Scientific News
ASMS 2016: Targeting Mass Spectrometry Tools for the Masses
The expanding application range of MS in life sciences, food, energy, and health sciences research was highlighted at this year's ASMS meeting in San Antonio, Texas.
Supplement May Switch off Cravings for High-Calorie Foods
Propionate is made by bacteria in the gut after they digest fiber, with researchers finding higher levels of the substance can curb cravings for junk food.
Link Between Canned Food, BPA Exposure Revealed
New Stanford research resolves the debate on the link between canned food and exposure to the hormone-disrupting chemical known as Bisphenol A, or BPA.
Peanut Allergy Prevention Strategy is Nutritionally Safe
Early-life peanut consumption does not affect duration of breastfeeding or children’s growth and nutrition.
A Future Tool for Medicine, Food Safety
A new type of electronic sensor that might be used to quickly detect and classify bacteria for medical diagnostics and food safety has passed a key hurdle by distinguishing between dead and living bacteria cells.
Local Microbes Can Predict Wine’s Chemical Profile
Regionally distinctive groups of bacteria and fungi, associated with local climate and environmental conditions, may leave a very specific “fingerprint” on a wine’s chemical composition, report University of California, Davis, researchers who collaborated on a new study with two Napa Valley wineries.
What Makes a Good Scientist?
It’s the journey, not just the destination that counts as a scientist when conducting research.
Genetically Engineered Crops Are Safe
Distinction between genetic engineering and conventional plant breeding becoming less clear, says new report on GE crops.
Developing Non-Allergenic 'Super' Peanuts
Scientists from The University of Western Australia have joined a global research team that have identified genes in peanuts that when altered will be able to prevent an allergic response in humans.
Checking the Quality of Chocolate With Ultrasound
The method, developed by researchers from KU Leuven, could save the chocolate industry a lot of time and money.
SELECTBIO

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,200+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,700+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!