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Analytical Technology Helps Britannia Food Ingredients Ensure Safe Wastewater Disposal

Published: Tuesday, March 05, 2013
Last Updated: Monday, March 04, 2013
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Britannia Food Ingredients selects Q45P AutoClean pH monitors and D15-76 monitor to indicate water quality.

Analytical Technology selected by Britannia Food Ingredients Ltd to ensure safe wastewater disposal.

Located in Goole, England, Britannia Foods Ingredients formed in 1966 produces a range of speciality fats for the chocolate, confectionery, biscuit and snack food industries.

Like all manufacturing companies, Britannia Foods must comply with strict regulations to ensure that trade effluent entering the public sewerage system is pre monitored to ensure it does not contain any harmful chemical levels.

Britannia Foods Ingredients trade effluent is handled by Yorkshire Water, who issue trade effluent consents relating to factors including the rate and maximum volume of the discharge, the temperature of the discharge and where the discharge may be made.

The conditions of a trade effluent consent are set for a number of reasons including preventing the corrosion of sewer fabric, overloading of sewers and possible flooding of properties, blockage of sewers and hazardous situations involving employees conducting maintenance within the sewerage system.

In order to comply with its trade effluent consent and ensure protection of human health, Britannia Food Ingredients selected Analytical Technology’s Q45P AutoClean pH monitors and D15-76 monitor with an Air Blast AutoClean system to indicate water quality and the presence of suspended solids in its waste water stream.

The D15-76 monitor has enabled Britannia Food Ingredients to realize turbidity measurements down to 0.001 Nephlometric turbidity units (NTU) and as high as 4000 NTU, eliminating the need for separate high and low ranges.

Britannia Foods Ingredients have found the pH and turbidity monitors to have overcome challenges associated with sensor fouling and are reliable, accurate and low maintenance.

Richard Stockdale, Operations Manager at Britannia Food Ingredients explains: “Both monitors have enabled us to comply wit the stringent trade effluent consent criteria outlined by Yorkshire Water, providing reliability and giving us peace of mind that our effluent will not negatively impact upon the environment or the sewerage system. In addition to this, we have found the Analytical Technology instruments and controllers to be extremely easy to programme and set-up, with the whole implementation process taking less than two days.”


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