Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Food & Beverage Analysis
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

100K Pathogen Genome Project Maps First Genomes

Published: Wednesday, May 22, 2013
Last Updated: Wednesday, May 22, 2013
Bookmark and Share
UC project announced that it has sequenced the genomes of its first 10 infectious microorganisms, including strains of Salmonella and Listeria.

“We are creating a free, online encyclopedia or reference database of genomes so that during a foodborne disease outbreak, scientists and public health professionals can quickly identify the responsible microorganism and track its source in the food supply using automated information-handling methods,” said professor Bart Weimer, director of the 100K Genome Project and co-director of BGI@UC Davis, the Sacramento facility where the sequencing is carried out.

Weimer estimates that the availability of this genomic information will cut in half the time necessary to diagnose and treat foodborne illnesses, and will enable scientists to make discoveries that can be used to develop new methods for controlling disease-causing microorganisms in the food chain.

The project is dedicated to sequencing the genomes of 100,000 bacteria and viruses that cause serious foodborne illnesses in people around the world.

In the United States alone, foodborne diseases annually sicken 48 million people and kill 3,000, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The initial 10 genome sequences mark the first in a series that the project will enter into a publicly available database at the National Center for Biotechnology Information of the National Institutes of Health.

“This initial release validates the entire process, from start to finish, of acquiring the bacterium, producing the genome sequence, and making automated public releases,” Weimer said.

A genome is the complete collection of an organism’s hereditary information.

Weimer said that the 100K Genome Project currently is sequencing a second set of 1,500 microbial genomes, with an anticipated release in the fall of 2013.


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,700+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Printed "Smart Cap" Detects Spoiled Food
It might not be long before consumers can just hit “print” to create an electronic circuit or wireless sensor in the comfort of their homes.
Tuesday, July 21, 2015
DNA Sequencing Lifts Veil on Wine’s Microbial Terroir
It’s widely accepted that terroir — the unique blend of a vineyard’s soils, water and climate — sculpts the flavor and quality of wine.
Wednesday, November 27, 2013
Grapevine Virus Screening Saves Napa-Sonoma $60M
Providing disease-free grapevines and rootstock to California’s famed North Coast wine region is money-wise to the tune of more than $60 million annually.
Tuesday, November 19, 2013
Center Targets Ocean Contaminants and Human Health
A new center based at UC San Diego will target emerging contaminants found naturally in common seafood dishes as well as man-made chemicals that accumulate in human breast milk.
Thursday, May 23, 2013
Quantity of Sugar in Food Supply Linked to Diabetes Rates
Eating too much of any food, including sugar, can cause you to gain weight; it’s the resulting obesity that predisposes people to diabetes, according to the prevailing theory.
Friday, March 01, 2013
Study Finds High Exposure to Food-borne Toxins
Researchers measured food-borne toxin exposure in children and adults by pinpointing foods with high levels of toxic compounds and determining how much of these foods were consumed.
Friday, November 16, 2012
$8.4 Million for Food Grain and Alternative Fuel Research
UC Davis plant scientist Eduardo Blumwald is reaching out to feed and fuel the world.
Monday, November 12, 2012
Scientific News
Decrease in Foodborne Outbreaks in Denmark
Almost every other registered salmonella infection in Denmark in 2014 was brought back by Danes travelling overseas.
How Safe Is Your Ground Beef?
If you don’t know how the ground beef you eat was raised, you may be putting yourself at higher risk of illness from dangerous bacteria. You okay with that?
Sweeteners Detected in Human Breast Milk
New data show that multiple types of NNS can be passed to nursing infants.
Food Science Team Finds Key to Tasty, Salt-Reduced Bread
Three food science researchers at the University of Alberta have discovered how to reduce salt in bread by half without compromising its taste or texture.
Yorkshire Scientists Could Hold Key to Preventing Future Horsemeat Scandals
Incidents like the horse meat scandal, which caused extensive damage to the UK’s farming and retail industry, could be consigned to the past thanks to revolutionary technology developed in the UK.
Detecting Hidden Ingredients
Researchers from China have used mass spectrometry to reveal the use of undeclared substances in dietary supplements.
Study Questions Presence in Blood of Heart-Healthy Molecules from Fish Oil Supplements
A new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania questions the relevance of fish oil-derived SPMs and their purported anti-inflammatory effects in humans.
How To Keep Your Rice Arsenic-Free
Researchers at Queen’s University Belfast have made a breakthrough in discovering how to lower worrying levels of arsenic in rice that is eaten all over the world.
Pesticide Found in 70 Percent of Massachusetts’ Honey Samples
New Harvard University study says that the pesticide commonly found in honey samples is implicated in Colony Collapse Disorder.
Printed "Smart Cap" Detects Spoiled Food
It might not be long before consumers can just hit “print” to create an electronic circuit or wireless sensor in the comfort of their homes.
SELECTBIO

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,700+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!