Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Food & Beverage Analysis
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

£60,000 Competition to Recognise Innovative Scientists Launched by BBSRC

Published: Friday, July 12, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, July 12, 2013
Bookmark and Share
Innovator of the Year 2014 competition launched by BBSRC to recognise and reward scientist's whose excellent science and innovations are delivering real world impact.

Innovator of the Year 2014, a prestigious competition from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), is now underway to recognise and reward innovation from BBSRC-funded scientists to deliver real-world impacts.

The competition, now in its sixth year, offers a personal award of £30,000 to the overall winner for taking their research beyond the lab to deliver social and economic benefits.

This year winners in the competition's three categories will each take away greater rewards of £15,000 each, up from £10,000 in previous years, with the overall winner receiving an additional £15,000 to make £30,000 in total prize money to support their research, training or other activities promoting economic or social impact.

Applications are open for entries to the competition's three categories of 'Commercial Innovator', 'Social Innovator' and 'Most Promising Innovator', designed to reflect the breadth of the benefits delivered by BBSRC's investment in UK bioscience.

Entry is open to all BBSRC-funded scientists with the deadline for nominations on 19 September and the deadline for applications 6 November. Nominations can be made by simply filling out a form at www.bbsrc.ac.uk/business/impact-incentive/innovator .

A shortlist of finalists will be completed in January 2014, with the winners to be announced in March 2014.

The finalists will be judged by an expert independent panel. The judges will be looking to recognise those innovators who have worked hardest and have gone furthest to take their science out of the lab to deliver impact.

Last year's winner was Dr Ryan Donnelly of Queen's University Belfast who won the Most Promising Innovator and Overall Innovator titles for his work on hydrogel-based microneedles.
Dr Donnelly said: "Winning BBSRC Innovator of the Year has been the highlight of my career to date. To be recognised in this way is something very special.

"From the point of view of progressing my own microneedle technology, I have already had contact from two world players in the pharma industry as a result of my award from BBSRC, with a view to conducting collaborative projects.

"I would thoroughly recommend academics to apply for BBSRC Innovator of the Year, due to enhanced visibility for their work, increased opportunity to network with peers and the real possibility of initiating collaborations."

Professor Douglas Kell, BBSRC Chief Executive, said: "Innovator of the Year has established itself as a highly respected and much anticipated competition. BBSRC funds world class research across the biosciences and translating that work into benefits for society and the economy is incredibly important.

"This is a great chance to recognise the excellent work that BBSRC-funded scientists do to generate impact and I'm very much looking forward to hearing about what I expect will be a very high calibre of entrants this year."


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,400+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,700+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Global Food Security (GFS) Develops New Funding Programme
New programme of research to tackle resilience of the food system.
Tuesday, June 02, 2015
£4M to Fund Important Food Crops from BBSRC and NERC
Research projects designed with industry partners to maximize impact.
Tuesday, June 02, 2015
Rising Temperatures Predicted to Lower Wheat Yields
An international consortium of researchers has used big data sets to predict the effects climate change on global wheat yields.
Friday, December 26, 2014
New Test For Detecting Horse Meat
New test compares differences in chemical compositions of the fat found in meats.
Tuesday, December 02, 2014
UK Diet and Health Research Awarded £4M
Funding awarded to six projects investigating diet and health to enable the food and drink industry to meet the needs of UK consumers.
Wednesday, June 25, 2014
A Synthetic Biology Approach to Improve Photosynthesis
Assembling a compartment inside chloroplasts of flowering plants has the potential to improve the efficiency of photosynthesis.
Friday, May 16, 2014
Rothamsted Research Granted Permission for new GM Field Trial
Permission granted by Defra for Rothamsted to carry out a field trial with GM Camelina plants that produce omega-3 fish oils in their seeds.
Monday, April 28, 2014
How Bacteria Communicate with us to Build a Special Relationship
Research is a key step in understanding how our bodies maintain a close relationship with the population of gut bacteria.
Monday, February 17, 2014
New Funding to Create Healthier and Safer Food
BBSRC and the Technology Strategy Board invests £8.5M in almost 40 research projects.
Wednesday, February 05, 2014
More than Bread and Beer: the National Collection of Yeast Cultures
Yeasts are one of the earliest, if not the earliest, biological tools used by people.
Thursday, November 28, 2013
Crop Plants – "Green Factories" for Fish Oils
Rothamsted Research scientists develop Camelina sativa plants that accumulate high levels of Omega-3 oils EPA and DHA in their seeds.
Monday, November 25, 2013
New Chromosome Map Points the Way Through Campylobacter’s Genetic Controls
The Institute of Food Research has produced a new map of the Campylobacter genome, showing the points where all of this pathogenic bacteria's genes are turned on.
Wednesday, November 13, 2013
Improved Ways of Testing Meat in the Food Chain
The horsemeat scandal has shown there is a need to improve, increase and expand current authenticity testing regimes.
Tuesday, November 12, 2013
How Bacteria with a Sweet Tooth May Keep us Healthy
Some gut bacterial strains are specifically adapted to use sugars in our gut lining to aid colonisation, potentially giving them a major influence over our gut health.
Wednesday, October 30, 2013
Vaccinating Cattle Against E. coli Could Drastically Cut Human Cases
A recent study has shown that vaccinating cattle against the E. coli O157 bacterium could cut the number of human cases of the disease by 85%.
Friday, September 20, 2013
Scientific News
How To Keep Your Rice Arsenic-Free
Researchers at Queen’s University Belfast have made a breakthrough in discovering how to lower worrying levels of arsenic in rice that is eaten all over the world.
Pesticide Found in 70 Percent of Massachusetts’ Honey Samples
New Harvard University study says that the pesticide commonly found in honey samples is implicated in Colony Collapse Disorder.
Printed "Smart Cap" Detects Spoiled Food
It might not be long before consumers can just hit “print” to create an electronic circuit or wireless sensor in the comfort of their homes.
Red Wine Antioxidant May Provide New Cancer Therapy Options
Resveratrol and quercetin, two polyphenols that have been widely studied for their health properties, may soon become the basis of an important new advance in cancer treatment,
New Research will Show How the Environment Could Change the Way We Eat
A new study funded by the Wellcome Trust will investigate how environmental changes over the next 20-30 years may impact the way we eat, in the UK and worldwide.
Blue LEDs Can be Used to Preserve Food
Blue light emitting diodes (LEDs) have strong antibacterial effect on major foodborne pathogens and can be used as a chemical-free food preservation method, a new study has found.
FDA Declares Trans Fatty Acids Unsafe for Consumption
TFAs are widely recognized as the most harmful fat with regard to causing cardiovascular disease (CVD).
Fat, Sugar Cause Bacterial Changes that may Relate to Loss of Cognitive Function
A study has indicated that both a high-fat and a high-sugar diet, compared to a normal diet, cause changes in gut bacteria that appear related to a significant loss of "cognitive flexibility," or the power to adapt and adjust to changing situations.
How Anthrax Spores Grow in Cultured Human Tissues
New findings to help predict risk and outcomes of anthrax attacks.
Food Research at the Microscale
Thermal stage microscopy allows food science microscopists to analyze samples under a range of conditions.
SELECTBIO

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,400+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,700+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!