Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Food & Beverage Analysis
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Chemist to Study ‘Orally Effective Therapy’ to Fight Obesity

Published: Thursday, August 15, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, August 15, 2013
Bookmark and Share
A chemist has received a federal grant to study the oral administration of PYY3-36, a peptide that inhibits food intake by naturally switching off one's appetite.

The project is said to have major implications for people struggling with obesity and associated diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Robert Doyle, associate professor of chemistry, has been awarded $221,000 by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at the National Institutes of Health. His project will last for two years, with the option of a third, and will involve Christian L. Roth, a pediatric endocrinologist at Seattle Children’s Hospital.

The award comes on the heels of a landmark decision by the American Medical Association to categorize obesity as a disease requiring a “range of interventions,” including weight-loss counseling, medication and surgery.

“Obesity is one of today’s leading health challenges—not only in North America and Europe, but also in Asia and Australia,” says Doyle, whose expertise spans chemistry and biology. “The prevalence of obesity among children and adolescents is of particular concern, despite public health education and initiatives.”

At the heart of Doyle's project is PYY3-36, a gut hormone that presumably supports the long-term benefits of bariatric surgery—currently, the only effective long-term exogenous treatment for obesity.
Doyle plans to utilize vitamin B12, which supports functioning of the brain and nervous system, to help protect and carry PYY3-36 through the gastrointestinal tract.

“We will trick the digestive system into carrying our peptide [PYY3-36], along with the B12,” says Doyle, who also holds faculty appointments in biology and biochemistry. “PYY3-36 will then send messages between the intestine and the brain, as well as in the brain, itself, telling you when you’re full. That’s why it’s called the ‘satiety peptide.’”

Since pharmacotherapy is merely an adjunct treatment for obesity management, the race is on to develop novel anti-obesity drugs that are safe and effective.

Doyle believes that orally effective therapy—particularly involving PYY3-36’s appetite-suppressing properties—may be the way forward.

“Ultimately, we want to develop an oral formulation that takes advantage of our bodies’ own appetite-control elements,” he says. “But first, we need to study its effects.”

Doyle, who earned a Ph.D. from Trinity College in Dublin, joined SU’s faculty in 2005. Since then, he has produced award-winning research that may lead to new treatments and diagnostic tools for diabetes and cancer. Much of his work, such as the utilization of B12 to orally deliver proteins, draws on chemical or systems biology research.


Further Information
Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 2,400+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 3,700+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.


Scientific News
How To Keep Your Rice Arsenic-Free
Researchers at Queen’s University Belfast have made a breakthrough in discovering how to lower worrying levels of arsenic in rice that is eaten all over the world.
Pesticide Found in 70 Percent of Massachusetts’ Honey Samples
New Harvard University study says that the pesticide commonly found in honey samples is implicated in Colony Collapse Disorder.
Printed "Smart Cap" Detects Spoiled Food
It might not be long before consumers can just hit “print” to create an electronic circuit or wireless sensor in the comfort of their homes.
Red Wine Antioxidant May Provide New Cancer Therapy Options
Resveratrol and quercetin, two polyphenols that have been widely studied for their health properties, may soon become the basis of an important new advance in cancer treatment,
New Research will Show How the Environment Could Change the Way We Eat
A new study funded by the Wellcome Trust will investigate how environmental changes over the next 20-30 years may impact the way we eat, in the UK and worldwide.
Blue LEDs Can be Used to Preserve Food
Blue light emitting diodes (LEDs) have strong antibacterial effect on major foodborne pathogens and can be used as a chemical-free food preservation method, a new study has found.
FDA Declares Trans Fatty Acids Unsafe for Consumption
TFAs are widely recognized as the most harmful fat with regard to causing cardiovascular disease (CVD).
Fat, Sugar Cause Bacterial Changes that may Relate to Loss of Cognitive Function
A study has indicated that both a high-fat and a high-sugar diet, compared to a normal diet, cause changes in gut bacteria that appear related to a significant loss of "cognitive flexibility," or the power to adapt and adjust to changing situations.
How Anthrax Spores Grow in Cultured Human Tissues
New findings to help predict risk and outcomes of anthrax attacks.
Food Research at the Microscale
Thermal stage microscopy allows food science microscopists to analyze samples under a range of conditions.
SELECTBIO

Skyscraper Banner
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
2,400+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
3,700+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FREE!