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Flow Meters Provide Valuable Data to Formula 1© Racing Teams

Published: Thursday, April 17, 2014
Last Updated: Thursday, April 17, 2014
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Company designs a very lightweight oval gear flow meter to be installed in the racing car fuel tank.

Titan Enterprises reports on the successful application of its flow meters for research by Formula 1© racing teams at their test facilities around the world.

Managing Director of Titan Enterprises - Trevor Forster commented “Flow meters have recently become a hot topic in Formula 1© with one team casting doubt on the approved fuel flow meter (not from Titan) that has to be fitted to every car”. He added “Because of this negative press we felt it right to share some of the successful implementations of Titan flow metering technology”.

A few seasons ago another F1© team did not trust the fuel flow figures being returned from their engine suppliers fuel management systems. Titan designed a very lightweight oval gear flow meter to be installed safely in the fuel tank of the racing car. Designed to be immune to immersion in fuel and the very noisy electrical environment of an F1© racing car the flow meter has provided accurate flow measurement over an extended period of time.

Other engine and car manufacturing companies are using Titan’s Atrato ultrasonic flow meter for both diesel and petrol measurement on test stands and in engine development. Unlike the controversial flow meter much discussed in the F1 racing press, the Atrato does not have a contorted flow path and fuel passes straight through the meter and can therefore be at the same bore as the fuel lines.

This reduces the pressure loss and keeps “dead” fuel volume to a minimum. A development of this meter is being undertaken with a diesel like fuel and tests, over the customers flow range, return accurate results from -20 to +30°C.

Titan high pressure flow meters have been widely used in the hydraulic systems of F1 racing cars to measure fluid flow. A high performance engine company also uses Titan flow meters to monitor the oil flow lubricating its turbo units on the test bench.

Formula 1 engines typically have no cooling fans and therefore need to reliably run at temperatures in excess of 200°C. Measuring the high flow of coolant water at these elevated temperatures without causing an undue pressure drop in the system was another development undertaken by Titan.

Using the inherent very low pressure drop of their Oval gear flow meter design - Titan produced a 200°C, 50 L/minute flow meter with a pressure drop of less than 100mBar.

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