Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Genomics
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>Events>This Event
  Events - September 2013


Your body is 3D, why is your cell culture not?

27 Sep 2013 - 27 Sep 2013 - Webinar



Bookmark and Share


3D cell-based applications close the gap between conventional in-vitro approaches and in vivo animal model research. By automating the 3D cell culture process and assay detection in a microplate based format, this significantly shortens development time of new drug candidates as well as offering more reliable statistical results.   

Tecan will present solutions for 3D cell culture systems using the Alvetex (Reinnervate), RAFT (TAP Biosystems)  scaffold based, and GravityPlus (InSphero) scaffold-free technology. In particular, automating a 3D cell culture system with the Freedom EVO® liquid handling platform offers a simple and reliable approach for cultivation, and the Infinite M-200 PRO multi-detection reader with its Optimal Read function in conjunction with the patent pending Gas Control Module (GCMTM) offers an excellent solution for acute and chronic toxicity tests, as well as multiplexed assays in cancer research.

Presenter:
Christian Oberdanner, PhD
Application Specialist Sales & Marketing, Tecan Austria GmbH

Christian Oberdanner, PhD, studied Molecular- and Cell-Biology at the University of Salzburg, Austria. In his doctoral thesis he focused on Reactive Oxygen Species-mediated apoptosis induction in photodynamic cancer therapy. 

Christian started to work for Tecan Austria as an external scientific consultant already during his last year at University. After his graduation he joined Tecan as Application Specialist in the department for research and development but quickly changed to the sales and marketing department. His expertise is on applications for Tecan’s multimode readers and microplate washers but he is also contributing to new product developments as a Junior Product Manager.


Further information
Scientific News
AACR 2016: Cancer Immunotherapy and Beyond
At this year's meeting there was a palpable buzz around subjects ranging from microbiomics to the tumor microenvironment and cancer vaccines, big data to in vitro and in vivo modeling and drug delivery (to name just a few).
Shining A Light On Bladder Cancer
Researchers scrutinize patterns of mutations in bladder tumor genomes, gleaning insights into the roles of DNA repair and tobacco-related DNA damage.
Monovar Drills Down Into Cancer Genome
Rice, MD Anderson develop program to ID mutations in single cancer cells.
Autism, Cancer Share a Remarkable Number of Risk Genes
Researchers with the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, MIND Institute identify more than 40 common genes.
Number Of Known Genetic Risk Factors For Endometrial Cancer Doubled
An international collaboration of researchers has identified five new gene regions that increase a woman’s risk of developing endometrial cancer, one of the most common cancers to affect women, taking the number of known gene regions associated with the disease to nine.
Genetic Variant May Help Explain Why Labradors Are Prone To Obesity
A genetic variation associated with obesity and appetite in Labrador retrievers – the UK and US’s favourite dog breed – has been identified by scientists at the University of Cambridge. The finding may explain why Labrador retrievers are more likely to become obese than dogs of other breeds.
How Scientists Use DNA to Track Disease Outbreaks
They’re the top questions on everyone’s mind when a new disease outbreak happens: where did the virus come from? When did this happen? How long has it been spreading in a particular country or group of people?
Genetic Risk Factors of Disparate Diseases Share Similar Biological Underpinnings
Penn Institute for Biomedical Informatics and colleagues identify "roadmap" of disease mechanisms to identify candidate drug targets.
Stem Cells Know How to Unwind
Research led by the Babraham Institute with collaborators in the UK, Canada and Japan has revealed a new understanding of how an open genome structure supports the long-term and unrestricted developmental potential in embryonic stem cells.
Childhood Asthma Research Receives $2M
Research into the impact of a child’s upbringing and social and physical environments on the development of asthma will receive $2 million to tackle the condition that affects as many as one in three Canadians.
Scroll Up
Scroll Down
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,000+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,500+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!