Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Genomics
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Genome Institute of Singapore and Roche NimbleGen: Tracking the Evolutionary Path of the H1N1 Influenza A

Published: Friday, May 29, 2009
Last Updated: Friday, May 29, 2009
Bookmark and Share
Researchers develop a generic PCR approach to amplify full genome of influenza A virus; followed by NimbleGen microarray-based hybridization sequencing.

The recent outbreak of the flu virus, the new strain of Influenza A (nH1N1), has rapidly spread around the world. Many experts are concerned for the evolutionary track of this new strain and whether it will mutate or re-assort with other influenza strains to potentially produce a more deadly strain, as the world experienced with the 1918 strain.

To identify these mutations and re-assortments, a team at the Genome Institute of Singapore has developed a novel “generic” Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) approach that can amplify the full genome of any influenza A virus; followed by NimbleGen microarray-based hybridization sequencing, that allows a rapid turn around for entire in about 24 hours.

This new method can use the same RNA material that is left over from traditional PCR based diagnostics and can recognize any novel strain of Influenza in the first pass. This will enable a faster development of diagnostics for any possible new variant; it also can determine if the strain of DNA changed to become even more dangerous.

Working in close collaboration with scientists from Roche NimbleGen, and utilizing the flexibility that the NimbleGen platform offers, the first arrays were designed, manufactured, and shipped to Singapore just 4 days after the project was started. The custom-developed high-density microarray contains probes which can reveal the complete sequence of the flu virus from patient samples. This will enable detection of any single base mutations in the regions of the genome, which is important for drug susceptibility. Where virus re-assortment has occurred, it will be able to identify which strain of Influenza A it has recombined with, as well as the genomic location of the re-assortment to better understand and track the evolutionary path and variants of the virus.

Dr. Christopher Wong, Chief Scientific Officer for Biomarker Development at the GIS said, “This new approach takes advantage of our novel PCR technology, developed for detecting a wide range of pathogens. This should greatly simplify the process of sequencing novel viruses.”

Dr. Gerd Maass, CEO of Roche NimbleGen, stated: “With the development of this new system, the entire project team hopes to better and more quickly track this new flu variant and keep the world informed of how the virus is evolving.”

GIS Executive Director Prof Edison Liu added, "The significance of this tracking process can be better appreciated in that it provides vital information that can be used to prevent or combat a pandemic.”

A similar approach using NimbleGen arrays was used successfully during the SARS outbreak in 2003 to understand the infectious source and to globally monitor the SARS virus.


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,000+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

Genome Institute of Singapore and Fluidigm Establish Asia's First Single-Cell Genomics Research Center
Center exclusively dedicated to accelerating the understanding of how individual cells work, and how diagnosis and treatment might be enhanced through insight derived from single cells.
Monday, December 17, 2012
Singapore Scientists Lead in 3D Mapping of Human Genome to Help Understand Human Diseases
This discovery is crucial in understanding how human genes work together, and will re-write textbooks on how transcription regulation and coordination takes place in human cells.
Thursday, February 02, 2012
Scientists’ Genetic Mapping of Han Chinese Provides Invaluable Information of Ethnic Chinese Ancestry
Findings provides invaluable information to determine the design and interpretation of genetic studies of human diseases.
Monday, December 07, 2009
Scientific News
AACR 2016: Cancer Immunotherapy and Beyond
At this year's meeting there was a palpable buzz around subjects ranging from microbiomics to the tumor microenvironment and cancer vaccines, big data to in vitro and in vivo modeling and drug delivery (to name just a few).
Shining A Light On Bladder Cancer
Researchers scrutinize patterns of mutations in bladder tumor genomes, gleaning insights into the roles of DNA repair and tobacco-related DNA damage.
Monovar Drills Down Into Cancer Genome
Rice, MD Anderson develop program to ID mutations in single cancer cells.
Autism, Cancer Share a Remarkable Number of Risk Genes
Researchers with the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, MIND Institute identify more than 40 common genes.
Number Of Known Genetic Risk Factors For Endometrial Cancer Doubled
An international collaboration of researchers has identified five new gene regions that increase a woman’s risk of developing endometrial cancer, one of the most common cancers to affect women, taking the number of known gene regions associated with the disease to nine.
Genetic Variant May Help Explain Why Labradors Are Prone To Obesity
A genetic variation associated with obesity and appetite in Labrador retrievers – the UK and US’s favourite dog breed – has been identified by scientists at the University of Cambridge. The finding may explain why Labrador retrievers are more likely to become obese than dogs of other breeds.
How Scientists Use DNA to Track Disease Outbreaks
They’re the top questions on everyone’s mind when a new disease outbreak happens: where did the virus come from? When did this happen? How long has it been spreading in a particular country or group of people?
Genetic Risk Factors of Disparate Diseases Share Similar Biological Underpinnings
Penn Institute for Biomedical Informatics and colleagues identify "roadmap" of disease mechanisms to identify candidate drug targets.
Stem Cells Know How to Unwind
Research led by the Babraham Institute with collaborators in the UK, Canada and Japan has revealed a new understanding of how an open genome structure supports the long-term and unrestricted developmental potential in embryonic stem cells.
Childhood Asthma Research Receives $2M
Research into the impact of a child’s upbringing and social and physical environments on the development of asthma will receive $2 million to tackle the condition that affects as many as one in three Canadians.
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,000+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,500+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!