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Pfizer and Samsung Medical Center Collaborate on Liver Cancer

Published: Friday, July 16, 2010
Last Updated: Friday, July 16, 2010
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Collaboration aims to conduct joint research to identify genomic mechanisms responsible for clinical outcomes in hepatocellular carcinoma.

Samsung Medical Center and Pfizer Inc. have announced that they have formed a research partnership to jointly analyze tumors from Korean patients to generate gene expression profiles and that may ultimately direct therapies and enhance clinical outcomes in the patients with liver cancer.

The two organizations held a signing ceremony at the main conference hall located on the fifth floor of Samsung Medical Center in Seoul on June 14 to commemorate the initiation of the collaboration. A research team led by top scientists at Samsung Medical Center, including Prof. Park Cheol-Guen, Prof. Im Ho-Young and Prof. Paik Soon-Myung, Director of the Cancer Research Center, will conduct research in Seoul, while Dr. Neil Gibson, Vice President of Oncology Research, will be responsible for the joint research program at Pfizer.

Pfizer expanded into the market for targeted anticancer agents with the launch of Sutent, an anticancer agent used to treat an advanced form of kidney cancer. Since then, the company has been consistently investing in research and development of innovative drug candidates and potential treatments for patients with liver cancer, a type of cancer especially prevalent in Asia, to address the growing need for an anticancer drug treating liver cancer in the Asian market in the future. Seeing the world-class clinical environment and outstanding research capabilities in Korea, the global pharmaceutical company formed a research partnership with Samsung Medical Center as part of its commitment.

"This partnership will serve as a great opportunity to combine Pfizer's know-how in drug development and Samsung Medical Center's extensive genome information and technology in the liver cancer area," said Neil Gibson, vice president of Oncology Research Unit in Pfizer Inc.

"We further plan to share the ownership of collected and analyzed data with Samsung Medical Center, contributing to advance of a variety of oncology research in Korea," Gibson said.

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