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Cancer Biomarkers Identified Using Chromatrap® ChIP Assay

Published: Wednesday, September 12, 2012
Last Updated: Wednesday, September 12, 2012
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New approach to ChIP assays - Developed by Porvair Filtration Group.

As the incidence of cancer is expected to affect around 26 million by 2030, clinicians and scientists strive to understand its initiation and proliferation at a molecular level.

Epigenetic research is key to these studies, examining heritable changes in gene expression that occur without the alteration in DNA sequence, and cancer.

Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays are an essential tool in epigenetic research. A new approach to ChIP assays called Chromatrap® has been developed by Porvair Filtration Group.

Based on Porvair’s proprietary BioVyon™ porous plastic materials and taking advantage of its long experience in separation techniques, Chromatrap® ChIP assay kits have particular relevance to identifying cancer biomarkers.

The development of Chromatrap®, a highly sensitive and specific ChIP Assay Kit, is the result of extensive research into chemically functionalizing the internal surfaces of micro porous High Density Polyethylene (HDPE).

Success has meant it is now being adopted in a growing number of new biochemical applications like Chromatrap®.

This novel Chromatrap® technology has been packaged in kits with easy to use spin columns for single use experiments or 96-well high throughput plates, ideal for multiple assays associated with drug screening.

The benefits are far reaching: improved purity with low signal to noise ratios and increased DNA recovery from small cell numbers.

Chromatrap® 96-well high throughput plates will be showcased at Genomics Research Europe, Frankfurt, Germany, 4th-5th September 2012.


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