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Yale-led Team Decodes Genetic Basis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Published: Friday, November 02, 2012
Last Updated: Thursday, November 01, 2012
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Study appears in the November 1 issue of the journal Nature.

In one of the largest studies of its kind ever conducted, an international team of scientists has thrown new light on the genetic basis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a group of chronic autoimmune digestive disorders affecting 2.5 million people worldwide. The study appears in the November 1 issue of the journal Nature.

The new study links variations in 163 regions of the human genome, 71 of which are newly discovered, to an increased risk of contracting IBD.

These regions showed a striking overlap with those implicated in other autoimmune diseases, note researchers, and suggest that IBD results from overactive immune defense systems that evolved to fight off serious bacterial infections.

In IBD, the body’s immune system produces an ongoing inflammatory reaction in the intestinal tract that injures the intestinal wall, leading to diarrhea and abdominal pain.

IBD patients typically require lifelong treatment with drug therapy, and often need surgery to repair tissue damage caused by the disease.

“Up until this point we have been studying the two main forms of IBD, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, separately,” said co-lead author Judy H. Cho, the Henry J. and Joan W. Binder Professor of Gastroenterology and professor of genetics at Yale School of Medicine. “We created this study based on what seems to be a vast amount of genetic overlap between the two disorders.”

In the first step of the study, the researchers conducted a “meta-analysis” of 15 previous genomic studies of either Crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC), the two most common forms of IBD, creating a large dataset that combined genetic information from some 34,000 individuals who took part in those studies.

The results then formed part of a second meta-analysis that included data from new genome-wide scans of more than 41,000 DNA samples from CD/UC patients and healthy comparison subjects collected at 11 centers around the world by the International IBD Genetics Consortium.

In addition to confirming that 92 regions identified in previous research confer a significant risk of CD, UC, or both, the study linked 71 additional stretches of the genome to IBD.

The IBD-linked variants identified by the scientists largely fall in genomic regions that regulate the expression of immune-system genes implicated in other autoimmune diseases, particularly the skin disease psoriasis and an inflammatory joint disorder known as ankylosing spondylitis.

Genes affected by these regulatory regions are also involved in the production of immune cells that fight infection by mycobacteria, a family of microbes that cause diseases such as leprosy and tuberculosis.

“We see a genetic balancing act between defending against bacterial infection and attacking the body’s own cells,” said Jeffrey Barrett of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in Cambridge, England, also a lead author of the study.

Barrett continued, “Many of the regions we found are involved in sending out signals and responses to defend against bad bacteria. If these responses are over-activated, we found it can contribute to the inflammation that leads to IBD.”

Nearly 100 scientists in 15 countries contributed to the new work, which “highlights the incredible power that working together in a large team can have,” said Cho, director of the inflammatory bowel disease center in Yale’s Department of Internal Medicine.

“This would not have been possible without the thousands of DNA samples from patients with these conditions assembled by the International IBD Genetics Consortium. Collectively, our findings have begun to uncover the biological mechanisms behind this disease.”


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