Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Genomics
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

DNA Variants Explain Over 10% of Inherited Genetic Risk for Heart Disease

Published: Monday, November 12, 2012
Last Updated: Monday, November 12, 2012
Bookmark and Share
About 10.6% of the inherited genetic risk for developing coronary artery disease (CAD) can be explained by specific DNA variations.

The research, conducted by scientists in the CARDIoGRAMplusC4D consortium, pinpointed 20 previously unidentified mutations during a two-stage meta-analysis of 63,746 patients with CAD, which causes more deaths worldwide than any other disease.

These genetic variants generally were infrequently found in the DNA of the 130,681 individuals without heart disease who were in the control group.

The new mutations have boosted to 47 the total number of DNA variants that have thus far been linked to an increased risk for developing CAD, said Panos Deloukas, Ph.D., who co-led the study and heads the Genetics of Complex Traits in Humans research group at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge, UK.

Scientists had previously estimated that 30 to 60% of the variation in CAD might be attributable to genetic risk factors, according to a study published in 2005*. The research reported at ASHG 2012 expands the number of specific genes that are likely involved.

"We no longer assume that coronary heart disease is triggered by just a handful of genes, each with a strong effect on a person’s risk for the disease,” said Dr. Deloukas. “Our research supports the current assumption that heart disease risk is determined by a large group of genes, each with a modest effect on risk.”

Aravinda Chakravarti, Ph.D., professor of medicine, pediatrics and molecular biology and genetics at Johns Hopkins University’s McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, who was not involved in conducting the study, commented, “Large genetic epidemiological studies, such as the one by CARDIoGRAM, have become critical for defining the specific loci that are major contributors to coronary artery disease. Although the specific genes and their variants that lead to susceptibility need to be discovered the current study is exciting in suggesting lipid levels and inflammation as key biological risk factors. These pathophysiological hypotheses demonstrate that we can understand complex diseases from comprehensive studies."

Identifying the genetic mutations that set the stage for CAD enables researchers to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the disease, which may lead to therapeutic targeting through drugs, Dr. Deloukas said.

Many of the newly identified variations are in genes that operate in biological pathways involved in the body’s metabolism of lipids or fats as well as in inflammation. The build-up of fatty cholesterol-rich plaque in blood vessels, a classic feature of CAD, not only can impair blood circulation but also can unleash the clots that obstruct blood flow to the heart and thereby cause heart attacks.

“Exactly how inflammation plays a role in heart attack remains a topic of ongoing research,” said Dr. Deloukas, adding that the consortium’s findings underscore the roles of high cholesterol levels and inflammation in CAD.

The researchers’ presentation is titled, “Coronary artery disease loci identified in over 190,000 individuals implicate lipid metabolism and inflammation as key causal pathways; evidence for independent signals in many of the risk loci.”


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,500+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 5,000+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

ASHG, The Jackson Laboratory Launch Educational Collaboration
New programs aim to integrate genetics and genomics into medicine.
Friday, June 13, 2014
New Method Helps Link Genomic Variation to Protein Production
Research presented at American Society of Human Genetics 2012.
Friday, November 09, 2012
Scientific News
Faecal Bacteria Linked to Body Fat
Researchers at King’s College London have found a new link between the diversity of bacteria in human poo – known as the human faecal microbiome - and levels of abdominal body fat.
Scientists Find Lethal Vulnerability in Treatment-Resistant Lung Cancer
The study describes how the drug Selinexor killed lung cancer cells and shrank tumors in mice when used against cancers driven by the aggressive and difficult-to-treat KRAS cancer gene.
How Baby’s Genes Influence Birth Weight And Later Life Disease
The large-scale study could help to target new ways of preventing and treating these diseases.
Genes Underlying Dogs’ Social Ability Revealed
The social ability of dogs is affected by genes that also seem to influence human behaviour, according to a new study from Linköping University in Sweden.
‘Cellbots’ Chase Down Cancer, Deliver Drugs Directly to Tumors
Programmable T cells shown to be versatile, precise, and powerful in lab studies.
Modified Yeast Shows Plant Response to Key Hormone
Researchers have developed a toolkit based on modified yeast to determine plant responses to auxin.
ReadCoor Launched to Commercialize 3D Sequencing Tech
ReadCoor will leverage the Wyss Institute’s method for simultaneously sequencing and mapping RNAs within cells and tissues to advance development of diagnostics.
NCI Collaborates with Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation
NCI collaborates with MMRF to incorporate genomic and clinical data into NCI Genomic Data Commons database.
Epigenetic Clock Predicts Life Expectancy
New research finds 5 percent of population ages faster, faces shorter lifespan.
Regulatory RNA Essential to DNA Damage Response
Researchers discover a tumour suppressor is stabilized by an RNA molecule, which helps cells respond to DNA damage.
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,500+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
5,000+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!