Corporate Banner
Satellite Banner
Genomics
Scientific Community
 
Become a Member | Sign in
Home>News>This Article
  News
Return

Syngene's G:BOX XR5 is Being Utilized at the University of Cambridge

Published: Friday, February 01, 2013
Last Updated: Friday, February 01, 2013
Bookmark and Share
To contribute to understanding which genes are involved in remyelination.

Syngene has announced that the G:BOX XR5 imaging system is being used at the University of Cambridge to visualize and analyze DNA as part of a research programme to understand the molecular mechanisms behind why the remyelination process fails in diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS).

Scientists in the Neurosciences Group at the Department of Veterinary Medicine, part of the University of Cambridge are using a G:BOX XR5 system to accurately image gels of fluorescent dye stained PCR products derived from genes involved in the remyelination process.

By studying these genes, the scientists hope to find a means of enhancing the repair of normally non-repairable clinical conditions such as MS.

Dr Chao Zhao Assistant Director of Research, in the Neurosciences Group says: “Our research focuses on the mechanism of remyelination of the central nervous system after demyelination. To do this we are trying to understand the molecular mechanism of why myelin repair fails in diseases such as MS and we use the G:BOX XR5 every day to visualize and sometimes analyze very small amounts of PCR products as part of this research.”

Dr Zhao continued: “We consistently get the results we want with our G:BOX XR5 so we are happy with the system for our DNA analysis work.”

Laura Sullivan, Syngene’s Divisional Manager said: “We are delighted to hear researchers at such a prestigious department in the university are using Syngene technology in this important programme. Their work is testament to the fact that for DNA analysis, the G:BOX XR5 is a totally reliable and sensitive gel documentation system.”


Further Information

Join For Free

Access to this exclusive content is for Technology Networks Premium members only.

Join Technology Networks Premium for free access to:

  • Exclusive articles
  • Presentations from international conferences
  • Over 3,300+ scientific posters on ePosters
  • More than 4,800+ scientific videos on LabTube
  • 35 community eNewsletters


Sign In



Forgotten your details? Click Here
If you are not a member you can join here

*Please note: By logging into TechnologyNetworks.com you agree to accept the use of cookies. To find out more about the cookies we use and how to delete them, see our privacy policy.

Related Content

100th Syngene Image Analyzer in Singapore
The new G:BOX system to be used alongside the 10 other Syngene analyzers purchased by the University since 2001.
Friday, July 16, 2010
Versatile Dyversity System at Leading European Cancer Research Centre
UK Cambridge Research Institute uses Dyversity to accelerate the pace of research on proteins and DNA associated with a variety of different cancers.
Friday, May 07, 2010
Versatile Dyversity System at Leading European Cancer Research Centre Rapidly Analyses Fluorescent and Chemiluminescent Proteins with Ease
Syngene, a world-leading manufacturer of image analysis sol- utions, is pleased to announce its Dyversity multi-application image analyser is being used by scientists in The Cancer Research UK Cambridge Research Institute (CRI) at the University of Cambridge, one of Europe’s major cancer research hubs, to accelerate the pace of research on proteins and DNA associated with a variety of different cancers.
Thursday, May 06, 2010
Syngene Partners with Sapient Discovery to Expand Integrated Drug Discovery Offerings
Companies to develop a platform with one stop shop for structure-guided discovery, chemistry, biology and structural biology capabilities.
Wednesday, February 04, 2009
Image Analyser used at Major US Pain Research Centre Improves Accuracy of Detecting Proteins Associated with Spinal Cord Injury
Syngene has announced that the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Centre (DHMC), is significantly improving detection of proteins associated with spinal cord injuries, using a G:BOX Chemi HR16.
Thursday, May 22, 2008
Dymension 2D Gel Analysis Software used at Specialist Institute
Syngene’s software is being used to identify proteins induced by an anti-addictive compound.
Friday, February 22, 2008
National Heart and Lung Institute Uses G:BOX Chemi HR16 Imager
Syngene G:BOX Chemi HR16 imaging system is being used at the National Heart & Lung Institute to assist in identifying proteins associated with cardio- myopathy.
Wednesday, October 31, 2007
GeneFlash Gel Documentation System is used in new Asthma Study
Researchers are using the GeneFlash to visualize 298 bp PCR fragments of Chlamydia pneumoniae.
Thursday, November 17, 2005
Scientific News
Liquid Biopsies: Miracle Diagnostic or Next New Fad?
Thanks to the development of highly specific gene-amplification and sequencing technologies liquid biopsies access more biomarkers relevant to more cancers than ever before.
Colon Cancer Blocked in Mice
Case Western Reserve University Researchers block common type of colon cancer tumour in mice, laying groundwork for human clinical trial.
Discovered Through ‘Big Data’ Analysis
Researchers at the SBP have identified over 100 new genetic regions that affect the immune response to cancer.
New Therapeutic Targets For Small Cell Lung Cancer Identified
Researchers at UTSW Medical Center have identified a protein termed ASCL1 that is essential to the development of small cell lung cancer and that, when deleted in the lungs of mice, prevents the cancer from forming.
Deciphering Inactive X Chromosomes
Untangling the Barr body of inactive X chromosomes valuable for understanding chromosome structure and gene expression.
Micro Disease-Detecting Senor Created
Researchers at McMaster University have created a microscopic disease-detecting sensor that can turn on to detect trace amounts of substances.
Liquid Biopsies Treating Ovarian Cancer
Researchers have discovered a promising monitor and treat recurrence of ovarian cancer. Detecting cancer long before tumours reappear.
Uncovering a New Principle in Chemotherapy Resistance in Breast Cancer
The NIH study has revealed an entirely unexpected process for acquiring drug resistance that bypasses the need to re-establish DNA damage repair in breast cancers that have mutant BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes.
Understanding Treatment Resistant Melanoma
Researchers have determined how advanced melanoma becomes resistant; a development toward developing treatments.
Investigating ‘Black Box’ of Human Genetics
Investigations into inactive X chromosomes have shown unusual DNA repeat elements are essential for maintaining 3D structure.
Skyscraper Banner

SELECTBIO Market Reports
Go to LabTube
Go to eposters
 
Access to the latest scientific news
Exclusive articles
Upload and share your posters on ePosters
Latest presentations and webinars
View a library of 1,800+ scientific and medical posters
3,300+ scientific and medical posters
A library of 2,500+ scientific videos on LabTube
4,800+ scientific videos
Close
Premium CrownJOIN TECHNOLOGY NETWORKS PREMIUM FOR FREE!