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New SI600C Cooled Shaking Incubator from Stuart

Published: Monday, May 13, 2013
Last Updated: Sunday, May 12, 2013
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New SI600C incubator is ideal for cell cultures.

The new SI600C cooled shaking incubator is the latest addition to the Stuart range of benchtop science equipment.

The SI600C has all the features of the successful SI600 shaking incubator, with the addition of a separate recirculating chiller to extend the achievable temperature range.

The original Stuart SI600 is a combined shaker and incubator, ideal for cell cultures.

With the inclusion of a Stuart SRC4 chiller, (or one of an equivalent specification) the SI600C incubator can now run at 15˚C below the ambient temperature of the room, to a minimum internal temperature of 5˚C.

The incubator can therefore be introduced into a whole new range of applications, such as cell-based protein expression, which often involves reduction of the culture temperature.

During heating and cooling with the SI600C, temperatures are very accurately controlled.

Separate controls for temperature and speed reduce the risk of accidental temperature adjustments, and USB communication allows long term tracking of the incubator’s temperature.

The SI600C cooled shaking incubator can hold up to six 2L flasks of various types without requiring tulip clamps or tools.

The flasks are securely held on a retractable, flexible platform, allowing easy access to samples at the back of the chamber.

Users can also purchase stainless steel tube racks, which magnetically couple to the instrument.

Biocote antimicrobial protection guards against contamination and reduces the risk of sample loss.

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