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Intomics Enters €5.2M Personalized Cancer Diagnostic Project

Published: Thursday, June 06, 2013
Last Updated: Thursday, June 06, 2013
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Vejle Sygehus, DTU, Exiqon A/S, and Intomics A/S have joined forces.

The project will optimize treatment of cancer patients based on the cancers’ individual genetic fingerprint. Intomics will use its leading biomedical data analysis capabilities to help choose the right treatment from cancer-derived genetic information.

The project receives €3.0M in financial support from The Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation.

Two cancer patients may respond very differently to the same treatment if their genetic cancer fingerprints differ.

Mutations in genes participating in key cancer pathways and mechanisms may impact whether a given patient responds well to a treatment or not.

“By enhancing our understanding of the correlation between key mutations in cancer pathways and treatment outcome, we can better select the optimal treatment for each individual patient” says Thomas S. Jensen, CEO of Intomics A/S.

Vejle Sygehus, the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Exiqon A/S, and Intomics A/S have joined forces to develop a future platform for precision medicine in a five-year project supported by The Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation.

The project will focus on colorectal cancer, where genetic information from many samples will be available.

Intomics A/S is developing sophisticated tools for analyzing and combining large quantities of biomedical data, including genetic variation data from individuals.

Based on these tools and Intomics’ unique expertise within molecular systems biology, genetic data derived from tumours will be analyzed and correlated with treatment outcome to advance the field of precision medicine.

Thomas S. Jensen continues, “We are very happy to be part of the project. I see a great synergy between the four partners and strongly believe that by teaming up with leading companies and research institutions in cancer research, data analysis, and diagnostic kit development, we can make important discoveries that can help cancer patients.”


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